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Sartre in Austria

Boycott, Scandals, and the Fight for Peace

Juliane Werner

problems, not solve them.” 35 The reactions to Les Mains sales were a severe test of this ideal. They made Sartre realize how irrelevant his own intentions were and thus contributed to the self-censorship evident in Austria and elsewhere (Spain, Greece

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Julienne Weegels

's grip as possible, without necessarily leaving one's ‘old’ life behind. Here, self-censorship becomes a tool to reverse prison's mortifying effects and to escape the transcarceral grip. Yet as former prisoners struggle to (re)build a straight life in the

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Autobiographical Innovations

Edmond Baudoin's Éloge de la poussière

Matthew Screech

The article analyses Éloge de la poussière ['In Praise of Dust'] (1995), an autobiographical bande dessinée by French cartoonist Edmond Baudoin (1942-). The work is compared with autobiographical writings by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Michel Leiris and Roland Barthes, Alberto Giacometti's approach to painting, and comics by Baru, Hergé, Hugo Pratt, Jacques de Loustal and Philippe Paringaux. It is argued that Éloge de la poussière is a non-linear autobiography that uses collage to suggest connections that readers may choose to make. The article examines how the book thematises the fallibility of memory, the tension between confession and self-censorship, the relationship between art and reality, and difficulty of ending an autobiography.

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Jean (Plantu) Plantureux

The publication of some caricatures of the prophet Mohammed by the Jyllands-Posten, a Danish newspaper, and their distribution around the globe provoked a tremendous outcry and debate, which even led to physical destruction and death. This raises fundamental questions about the nature of blasphemy, (self-)censorship and the freedom of expression, the responsibility of cartoonists, trans-cultural communication, and the power of caricature. The author, who played a direct role in the French part of this affair, reflects on the questions it raises and on his own practice of editorial cartooning.

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'in plain English, stark naked'

Orlando, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Reclaiming Sapphic Connections

Alison Winch

Despite her claims to truth and plainness, however, Montagu’s autobiographical account is embellished, feigned and fragmented. She rewrites herself as a precocious fourteen-year-old as opposed to nineteen, and the related events and emotions do not always correspond with those outlined in her letters. In failing to write in so ‘plain a manner’, Montagu gestures at the inevitable fabrication involved in writing the self and in writing history. In particular, she exposes the difficulty of portraying a protagonist who ‘had a way of thinking very different from that of other Girls’ (79), of inscribing a person who defies the fixed, gendered categories of ‘plain English’. The problematics of depicting history and conforming to that powerful dictator, ‘reputation’, are further evident in Montagu’s ‘History of her Own Times’which she reportedly destroyed ‘as fast as she finished it, in a sustained, heroic act of self-censorship’.2 Indeed, the contradictory impulse to write the life of Montagu and to write it according to the policing gaze of ‘Chastity, Modesty and Purity’ plagues Montagu’s self-representations, as well as those of the critics who attempt to write and edit her life for future readers.

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Hegemony

Critical interpretations in anthropology and beyond

Gavin Smith

The popularity of the notion of hegemony in anthropology and cognate disciplines has waxed and waned. The self-censorship of Gramsci's most accessible writings (Selections from the prison notebooks) and the multi-layered nature of his thinking have led to a variety of understandings of the term. Easier to reflect on historically, after the events, than to use for analyses of the present, hegemony is both attractive to intellectuals insofar as it establishes their role in politics and yet prone to vagueness in its application to real life situations. For these reasons perhaps, the notion is now on the wane. Yet before we throw out the baby with the bath water, we need to reflect on precisely how it has been used in social analysis and praxis. This article takes a critical view of those people who have most influenced anthropologists in their understanding of the term and argues that the fetishization of 'culture' has probably done more to mystify the concept than anything else.

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Dow Chemical's Knowledge Factories

Action Anthropology against Michigan's Company Town Culture

Brian McKenna

The article describes my efforts as a public anthropologist/journalist in addressing the official culture of silence in Michigan's colleges, universities and towns regarding Dow Chemical's extensive environmental health pollution and corruption. These sites include Midland, Michigan, home of Dow's international headquarters, and my own residence of East Lansing, site of Michigan State University, the state's largest higher education institution. Both are beneficiaries of Dow largess or philanthropy. This relative silence - which extends to nearly all state media and universities - is remarkable considering the fact that, unlike turn of the century company towns, Dow Chemical operates in a civic culture where thousands of highly educated professionals work in education, government and communications. Democracy is degraded by processes of accumulation, ideology, fear, suppression, conformity, specialization and, importantly, the self-censorship of professionals and academics. With Eriksen (2006) and Hale (2008) I argue for an engaged anthropology where anthropologists step out of their academic cocoons to embrace the local public. This is 'not just a matter of … reaching broader publics with a message from social science … it is a way of doing social science' (Hale 2008: xvii). This case study illustrates how an anthropologist engaged contradictions in order to show how Michigan universities are becoming veritable knowledge factories in service to Eisenhower's feared military-industrial-academic complex.

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Ophelia Is Not Dead at 47

An Interview with Nabyl Lahlou

Khalid Amine and Nabyl Lahlou

Translator : Katherine Hennessey

strong, smart and meaningful, born as a protest against self-censorship and against the fear of censorship. I wrote Ophelia Is Not Dead in a spirit of and a desire for total freedom, a universal vision of serving humankind. And once it was completely

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Safi Mahmoud Mahfouz

socialist country including the Soviet Union. This created an atmosphere of forced self-censorship for theatre practitioners, as well as for reviewers and theatre scholars. In an astute article on theatre reviewing and the problems of sourcing for theatre

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Ivan Jablonka

Translator : Nathan Bracher

research would thwart the human sciences’ potential for emancipation. The very real academic constraints must not be confused with the processes of voluntary servitude, self-censorship, fear of the judgment of “peers,” in other words of academic gossip. How