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Katherine Clonan-Roy

In 1988, Michelle Fine explored the ways in which damaging patriarchal discourses about sexuality affect adolescent girls, and hinder their development of sexual desire, subjectivities, and responsibility. In this article, I emphasize the durability and pliability of those discourses three decades later. While they have endured, they shift depending on context and the intersections of girls’ race, class, and gender identities. Calling on ethnographic research, I analyze the intersectional nuances in these sexual lessons for Latina girls in one (New) Latinx Diaspora town.

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Sex Talk Online

Sexual Self-Construction in Adolescent Internet Spaces

Eszter Szucs

The teen-targeted website gURL. com is committed to providing educational information about sexuality and sexual health to young girls. In this article, I analyze girls' conversations posted on the site to explore how girls mediate the factual information presented, and how they challenge the borders of the scientific discourse on adolescent sexuality. Without overvaluing the freedom of online environments, I assume that the relatively unregulated space of the Internet encourages young women to create their narratives about sexuality and to imagine themselves as sexual beings. My assumptions are informed by the analyses of Susan Driver (2005), Barclay Barrios (2004) and Susannah Stern (2002): in contrast to the disempowering and alienating effects of institutional policies, I call for the recognition of less regulated sites, which imagine youth not as passive recipients but as active agents who strategically work on developing their understanding of sexuality, and on exploring their sexual selves.

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"The Individual Can . . ."

Objectifying Consent

D.H. Mader

The issue of age of consent for sexual activities has been bedevilled by the absence of any objective standards or criteria for what is meant by or involved in "consent." Despite this absence—or because of it—the social and political response has been to reach for blanket prohibitions on sexual activity by persons under particular ages—ages which have settled in the mid‐ to late teens. At the same time, the percentages of persons aged 15 and under who are sexually active in our societies indicate that young people are regularly consenting to sexual activities. Consent to sexual activity has also been a concern in relation to the lives of the cognitively or mentally impaired. In an attempt to clarify issues surrounding consent there, a significant proposal in regard to objectifying standards for consent was reported by Carrie Hill Kennedy, in her article “Assessing Competency to Consent to Sexual Activity in the Cognitively Impaired Population” (Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology 1:3, 1999), where she developed a two‐part scale for ability to consent, including twelve criteria involving knowledge and five criteria involving personal assertiveness and safety. Kennedy herself has maintained that there is no relevance for her research as applied to minors: adults have sexual rights, minors do not. However, it would seem clear that there is a certain relevance—if not in the use of a similar scale for assessing the competence of a particular minor to consent, then in generally comparing the age at which children attain the developmental level comparable with that implied by Kennedy’s five Safety standards, and using that information to critique the present, obviously unrealistic ages of consent. In relation to the Knowledge scale, the importance of sexual education becomes still clearer.

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Ayse Serap Avanoglu, Diana Riboli, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Annalisa Butticci, Iain R. Edgar, Matan Shapiro, Brooke Schedneck, Mark Sedgwick, Suzane de Alencar Vieira, Nell Haynes, Sara Farhan, Fabián Bravo Vega, Marie Meudec, Nuno Domingos, Heidi Härkönen, Sergio González Varela, and Nathanael Homewood

Centuries ,204 pp., notes, bibliography. London: I.B. Tauris, 2016. Hardback, $99. ISBN 9781780767512. The politics of sex and sexual education remains controversial in the Arab world and in Islamic societies. Yet Islam was a significant source of sexual

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“Isn't That a Girl Problem?”

Boys, Bodies, and the Discourse of Denial

Michael Kehler and Chris Borduas

2015 Ontario Sexual Education Curriculum documents, the discourse of denial has and continues to present itself among right-wing conservative government agencies and among parents, and moreover contributes to a “climate of fear, a chill, or at the very

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Consent is not as Simple as Tea

Student Activism against Rape Culture

Brittany Adams

). Nonetheless, interdisciplinary scholars have documented the prevalence of sexual predation in Western cultures (see Smith 2014 ), as well as the lack of holistic sexual education that includes discussion of social and cultural norms around sex ( SIECUS 2017

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Mark McKinney, Jennifer Howell, Ross William Smith, and David Miranda Barreiro

the regime to the values embodied by Superman is comical at times, for example portraying Superman / Clark Kent as an asexual character and therefore damaging to the (hetero)sexual education of Spanish children, but it also shows the potential of

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The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Central and Eastern Europe

The Rise of Autocracy and Democratic Resilience

Petra Guasti

rules only allowing 90-days. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the Polish parliament commenced discussion of two legislative proposals—further limits on legal access to abortion and criminalization of sexual education (with up to a three-year jail sentence

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Ian McEwan Celebrates Shakespeare

Hamlet in a Nutshell

Elena Bandín and Elisa González

behaves as if they were a real couple, making love to her and getting angry at her silence. This insane behaviour is obviously the consequence of childhood traumas and an inadequate sexual education: ‘my father's death rattle, my mother's terror of

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Elias L. Khalil

, receive sexual education and so on. Individuals and societies make decisions that optimise wellbeing – and such decisions are not the concern of this article since they do not pertain to drawing boundaries. As for boundaries, they are determined by non