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Ambivalent Sexualities in a Transnational Context

Romanian and Bulgarian Migrant Male Sex Workers in Berlin

Victor Trofimov

sexualities. I argue that the sexual ambiguity Sergio exposed in his verbal and nonverbal behavior is neither unique for him nor merely an individual characteristic of his persona. Instead, the contradiction between Sergio's corporeal enactment of his

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Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

Men's prostate orgasms, cuckold culture, breastfeeding fathers, and erectile dysfunction technologies have epithetically signaled how men's bodies, sexualities, and masculinities have exceeded the gender and sexual order of modernity. A

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Lowry Martin

This article explores how two Franco-Moroccan films have used their transformative potential and diversity to challenge notions of fixed sexual identities and lift the veil on representations of nonnormative Arab sexualities. Abdellah Taïa

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Jacob Breslow, Jonathan A. Allan, Gregory Wolfman, and Clifton Evers

Miriam J. Abelson. Men in Place: Trans Masculinity, Race, and Sexuality in America (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2020), 264 pp. ISBN: 9781517903510. Paperback, $25. Beginning with the deceptively simple premise that trans

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Minority Report

Perceptions and Realities of Black Men in Heterosexual Porn

Darryl L. Jones II

a long recorded history of assumptions and observations about black male sexuality and the black penis. Ronald Segal (2001) notes that the ancient Greek physician-surgeon-philosopher Galen was among the first to incorporate negative assumptions of

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Naming our sexualities

Secular constraints, Muslim freedoms

Katherine Pratt Ewing

Terms of a Western discourse of homosexuality shape conflicts surrounding sexual identity that are faced by many Muslims, especially those who live in diasporic communities. Many use essentialized categories to articulate their sexual orientations and express incommensurabilities between their sexuality and their identities as Muslims. This article argues that discursive constructions of the Muslim as traditional other to the secular sexual subject of a modern democracy generate an uninhabitable subject position that sharply dichotomizes sexual orientations and Muslim family/religious orientations, a dichotomization that is reinforced by well-publicized backlashes against open homosexuality in several Muslim countries. Yet observations made during ethnographic field research in Pakistan, as well as scholarly evidence from other Muslim countries, suggest that many Muslims are less troubled by sex and desire in all their possible forms than they are by the peculiar modern practice of naming our sexualities as the basis for secular public identities.

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Christianity and Sexuality

Girls and Women Forge New Paths

Sharon Woodill

Sonya Sharma. 2015. Good Girls, Good Sex: Women Talk about Church and Sexuality . Fernwood Publishing. 112 pp. $21.00. ISBN 978-1-5526-6438-4 (paperback) In Good Girls, Good Sex: Women Talk about Church and Sexuality , Sonya Sharma explores the

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Abdessamad Dialmy

Arab scholarship of sexuality is currently emerging against many obstacles. This article provides a suggestive introduction to the current state of knowledge in the area. After briefly sketching an archetype of Arab sexuality, especially its peculiar form of phallocracy, new sexual trends are reviewed, some of which adapt current practices to Shari'a law (e.g., visitation marriages), while others break with it altogether (e.g., prostitution). The article then discusses three distinctive areas of public and policy concerns in the region, namely, honor killings, impotence and Viagra use, and sex-education programs that are precipitated by concerns over HIV/AIDS. The essay concludes with an assessment of some of the main challenges still facing research into the topic in the Arab Islamic world.

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Michael G. Cornelius

In the Nancy Drew mystery series, whenever the subject of marriage arises, Nancy interrupts the conversation or changes it altogether. Rather than discuss or confront issues of sexuality, Nancy forestalls any mention of marriage and the ensuing responsibilities (and identity shifts) that it—and mid-century womanhood in general—implies. Interruption, as both a conversational tactic and a social act, can be used by women to assert agency. Thus for Nancy, interruption is a means of holding off her impending womanhood and extending the enviable position she now maintains—that of girl sleuth.