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Introduction

Print Culture, Mobility, and The Pacific, 1920–1950

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

through print form part of and transform social identity? As the articles in this special section highlight, in the early to mid-twentieth century, geographical mobility increasingly became associated with the possibilities of upward social mobility. Print

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A Social Negotiation of Hope

Male West African Youth, ‘Waithood’ and the Pursuit of Social Becoming through Football

Christian Ungruhe and James Esson

form of popular entertainment coalesces with a geographical imagination that conflates social mobility with certain places, which, in turn, cultivates the dreams of thousands of young West Africans to migrate to Europe and become professional

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Elite de Façade et Mirages de l’Independance

Les Petits Entrepreneurs Etrangers en France dans l’Entre-Deux-Guerres

Claire Zalc

In the literature, immigrant entrepreneurs are described as the élite of the best “integrated” immigrants. Histories of migrant communities all insist on the role of the entrepreneurs as the center of the community and the symbol of social success. In this paper, I will discuss the diverse social meaning attached to being an entrepreneur for an immigrant in Paris during the interwar period. In order to describe the social position of immigrant entrepreneurs, I worked on professional careers, based on the study of more than two hundred applications for French nationality from foreign entrepreneurs during the first half of the twentieth century. It's hard to conclude that there is a one-way social mobility of entrepreneurs, either ascendant or descendent. While some went from the working class to owning a shop, eventually able to spend and save money, others became entrepreneurs as a necessity rather than choice.

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Jacqui Close

the policy were the belief that anyone who could gain a university place, should be offered one as a matter of social justice and to increase upward social mobility ( Milburn 2009 ). 4 Although it is not advisable to reduce identities to crude

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Mercedes González de la Rocha and Agustín Escobar Latapí

ABSTRACT

For as long as national records have been kept, Indigenous rural girls in Mexico have spent the least amount of time in school (aside from some people with disabilities). An innovative social program was designed in the 1990s that aimed to stop the intergenerational transmission of poverty through the provision of cash transfers (higher for girls than for boys) to families, conditional upon their children’s attendance at school and health clinics. We set out to assess whether or not the program had closed these gender and ethnicity gaps and found that it did narrow substantially pre-existing inequalities among rural indigenous poor girls and their families and, in some instances, reversed them. We recognize that the program does not eliminate other structural forces discriminating against indigenous Mexican girls and that prolonged education is an instrument for mobility only if these other forces are counterbalanced by more comprehensive social strategies.

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'The Best Way to See Waterloo Is with Your Eyes Shut'

British 'Histourism', Authenticity and Commercialisation in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

Pieter François

This article analyses how nineteenth-century British visitors of Waterloo anticipated, experienced and explained their visit of 'the field'. The article shows how British visitors attempted to claim ownership over Waterloo and to legitimise their own commemorative practices by simultaneously searching for authenticity and longing for the familiarity (and commercialisation) of the 'beaten track'. By doing so this article calls for a shift in our understanding of nineteenth-century British Waterloo tourism. The view that emphasises the succession of an early generation of authentic travellers by a later generation of 'mere' tourists is replaced by a view which sees the desire for authenticity and the need for the familiar as two forces which were continuously negotiated in creative ways by travellers throughout the whole nineteenth century.

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The emergence of the global debt society

Governmentality and profit extraction through fabricated abundance and imposed scarcity in Peru and Spain

Ismael Vaccaro, Eric Hirsch, and Irene Sabaté

, naturalized entailment of their commitment to advancement, progress, and upward social mobility. Consumption through credit is seen as a way to overcome a previous situation of exclusion and to engage with emulation practices, as has been the case for black

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From Ebony to Ivory

‘Cosmetic’ Investments in the Body

Chiara Pussetti

research indicates – especially in situations of serious social and income disadvantages and very elusive prospects of social mobility – body manipulation is considered a valid strategy to increase social inclusion, to climb the social ladder and to improve

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Places of Otherness

Comparing Eastleigh, Nairobi, and Xiaobei, Guangzhou, as Sites of South-South Migration

Neil Carrier and Gordon Mathews

, and it is in such places that many dreams of mobility and social mobility take shape. The article will accordingly give overviews of Eastleigh and Xiaobei and their mobility dynamics, dynamics that share some similarities (being generally built on the

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Julie Fette

Jablonka’s method and my form of historical writing here attempt to fathom. Currently in their eighties living in Paris, my daughter’s grandparents are Moroccan Jews who opted for France several years after independence. Products of the social mobility and