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Suspicion and the Economy of Trust among Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon

Leonardo Schiocchet

My ethnography of Palestinian refugees in Lebanon (2005–2010) points to a strong disposition towards suspicion associated with refugeeness. This, in turn, highlights politico-moral economies of trust, indexed by honour, that become what I call boundary-maintenance disciplinary practices. The dynamics of suspicion and trust, propelled by social crisis and uprooting, shape all groups, from their social support systems and marriages to collective political, ethnic and religious allegiances. Uprooting tends to be associated with displacement of the subject's social order, bringing about an intensified sense of intra-group bonds and a concomitant suspicion towards those outside this group. This, in turn, heightens a necessity on the part of refugee subjects to reflect and shape networks of trust, expressed in a moral idiom, even when decisions are known to be political. This article analyses some of the dynamic between suspicion and trust in conditions of social crisis and refugeeness.

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Suspicion and Evidence

On the Complexities of Online Truth-Seeking in Times of Uncertainty

Mathijs Pelkmans

expressed certainty that they were the ones asking the relevant questions. Presenting themselves as truth seekers who are ‘awake’, they offer an interesting perspective on what it means to know, in a ‘misinformation age’. Moreover, the features of suspicion

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From Epistemology of Suspicion to Racial Profiling

Hans Gross, Mobility, and Crime around 1900

Gal Hertz

from the natural sciences, and adjusted them to the purposes of criminal investigation. Gross's introduction of an “epistemology of suspicion,” to paraphrase Paul Ricœur, provided a scientific methodology, which at the same time operated along these

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When partners are suspect(s)

Trust, transparency, and racialised suspicion in global health infrastructures

Cal Biruk

working conditions and claimed the sugar company was evicting farmers to garner more land ( Kiezebrink et al. 2015 ). The report, and the server's warning to us, speak to the suspicions and mistrust that characterise relations between managers and workers

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Danger, Moral Opacity, and Outrage

Fear of Jihadism and the Terrorist Threat in Southern Mali

Tone Sommerfelt

order. Whereas many interlocutors described suspicions of the “Salafi threat” in Bamako as exaggerated, others expressed the need to defend the nation. This article moves between expressive aspects, rumors, and stories of conspiracies, as well as media

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“You're a Trickster”

Mockery, Egalitarianism, and Uncertainty in Northeastern Namibia

Megan Laws

encounters” ( Beatty 2013: 420 ) that may, elsewhere, justify doubt and suspicion are, here, set aside. The reality of the “opacity of other minds” ( Robbins and Rumsey 2008: 408 )—the difficulty, in other words, of knowing what other people think, feel, or

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Legitimate Suspicions? Berlusconi and the Judges

David Nelken

The relationship in the course of 2002 between Silvio Berlusconi’s

government and the judges was one of continued and unrelenting

conflict. Few days passed wherein justice was not a central news item.

Accounts of battles between the government and the judiciary carried

titles such as “the duel,” and offered complex descriptions of the

moves and countermoves, in both Parliament and the courts, involving

the government, the opposition, judges, prosecutors, lawyers, and

the accused. Cases of political, administrative, and business corruption

still came to light from different parts of the country, such as

Turin, Milan, Potenza, Salerno, and Agrigento. But the heady days of

Tangentopoli were long over: it was now the judges who were themselves

under attack. For most of the year, Berlusconi and his associates

cast themselves in the role of victims by arguing that they were

being prosecuted and tried by politically and personally biased judges.

The judiciary was made the object of co-ordinated mass media campaigns

that set out in particular to discredit the Milan court and more

generally to show that when judges’ actions were effective, they were

often illegitimate, and that when they were legitimate, they were usually

not effective. Although some of the printed media still gave

unswerving support to the judges, there was little doubt that the initiative

had passed to the government and its parliamentary majority.

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Introduction

Affective States—Entanglements, Suspensions, Suspicions

Mateusz Laszczkowski and Madeleine Reeves

The aim of this special issue is to bring a critical discussion of affect into debate with the anthropology of the state as a way of working toward a more coherent, ethnographically grounded exploration of affect in political life. We consider how the state becomes a 'social subject' in daily life, attending both to the subjective experience of state power and to the affective intensities through which the state is reproduced in the everyday. We argue that the state should be understood not as a 'fiction' to be deconstructed, but as constituted and sustained relationally through the claims, avoidances, and appeals that are made toward it and the emotional registers that these invoke. This article situates these arguments theoretically and introduces the subsequent ethnographic essays.

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Book Reviews

Laura Levine Frader, Ian Merkel, Jessica Lynne Pearson, and Caroline Séquin

welcoming host. Kathleen Keller, Colonial Suspects: Suspicion, Imperial Rule, and Colonial Society in Interwar French West Africa (Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2018). Review by Jessica Lynne Pearson, Macalester College. A

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Becoming Communist

Ideals, Dreams, and Nightmares

Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild

, International Communism and the Spanish Civil War: Solidarity and Suspicion , Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, xiii, 278 pp., $29.99 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-131-622690-2. Both these books are important for their emphasis on the quotidian in two