Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 556 items for :

  • "temporality" x
Clear All
Free access

The temporality of illegality

Experiences of undocumented Latin American migrants in London

Ana Gutiérrez Garza

aim in this article is to understand the temporality of becoming illegal, to examine how migrants experience illegality, and how it is embodied and negotiated on a daily basis. Examining the relationship that exists between illegality and temporality

Full access

Daniel M. Knight

had been a national phenomenon in 1970s Greece, but her decision to bring up the topic now had caught me unawares. ‘Well, all these people here, all these stall attendants, their families, are experiencing a temporal flux ( chroniki reustotita ). Time

Full access

Temporality of Movements in the North

Pragmatic Use of Infrastructure and Reflexive Mobility of Evenkis and Dolgans

Vladimir N. Davydov

techniques and technologies (e.g., Komkov et al. 2016 ; Tsukerman 2013 ). Usually, insufficient attention is paid to the temporal dimension of such mobility. In many respects, this creates a one-sided view representing mobility from the perspective of a

Full access

Ksenia Gavrilova

–156). It is important to note that all these connections to nature, subsistence, or community are reinforced by temporal aspects: “stayers” are those who were born in a village or have spent a significant amount of time there. This pattern correlates with

Free access

Freak Temporality

Female Adolescence in the Novels of Carson McCullers

Alison Sperling

maturation (physical and psychic) do not culminate in what is thought to be normative womanhood, but, rather, in their identification with freakishness, form the conditions for what I am calling freak temporality . Freak temporality operates against hetero

Full access

Boredom, Rhythm, and the Temporality of Ritual

Recurring Fieldwork in the Brazilian Candomblé

Inger Sjørslev

Setting out from fieldwork experiences in the ritual of the Brazilian Candomblé, this article aims to understand temporality in different ways. The significance of 'unfocused presence' in the field is discussed by way of the concept of 'deep hanging out'. The boredom experienced by the fieldworker is analyzed in relation to sentiments expressed by the people involved in ritual and the fieldworker's changing emotions over time, as previous experiences influence how time spent waiting is perceived. In ritual as well as in the interaction between fieldworker and the people in the field, temporality is deeply related to sociality and the aesthetics of social rhythm. It is concluded that the fieldworker is drawn into the time-geography of the field in a joint chore ography of social interaction.

Full access

Steffen Dalsgaard

In sociological literature, the most commonly accepted meaning of 'the state' is based on a spatial definition that describes it as an entity exercising sovereignty within a bounded territory. However, the state is also made present in time, and state forms have a profound impact on the temporalities of social events and interaction, for instance, through rhythms and schedules. Consequently, this article discusses how the state in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea, can be understood with reference to temporality as much as to spatiality and materiality. Here, the state is seen as being personified in its politicians, who are in control of its resources. In this understanding, the state is both facilitated and limited by the presence, attention, and duration of the politicians, who are obliged to recognize personal relationships through which kin or acquaintances can challenge bureaucratic control of space and of time.

Full access

Troublesome Temporalities

Europe between Nostalgia and Promise

Cris Shore

The three articles published in this Forum section were all finalists for the Graduate Student Prize of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe (SAE), which met at the American Anthropological Association’s 2013 meeting in Chicago. While they deal with different parts of Europe (Bulgaria and Romania and Spain, respectively), what unites them is a shared interest in issues of loss, social memory, identity, agency and death, and, in particular, the way people experience temporality and change (see Connerton 1989; Forty and Küchler 1991). The authors brilliantly capture the mood of uncertainty and anxiety facing Europeans in a period of unprecedented uncertainty, insecurity and austerity. What they also show is how Europe’s poor and marginalised are both shaped by and, in turn, try to shape or subvert the national and European policy regimes to which they are subjected.

Full access

Crafting Future Selves

Time-Tricking and the Limits of Temporal Play in Children’s Online Film-Making

Espen Helgesen

days to her upcoming birthday, or comparing her age to those around her, Amina positioned herself on temporal maps by quantifying time. In Norway, one could argue, this socialization into spaces where things have to be counted for them to count is

Full access

Differences in temporal reasoning

Temporal complexity and generational clashes in an East German city

Felix Ringel

Hoyerswerda, Germany's fastest-shrinking city, faces problems with the future that seem initially unrelated to the past and yet excite manifold conflicting accounts of it. The multiple and conflicting temporal references employed by Hoyerswerdians indicate that the temporal regime of postsocialism is accompanied, if not overcome, by the temporal framework of shrinkage. By reintroducing the analytical domain of the future, I show that local temporal knowledge practices are not historically predetermined by a homogenous postsocialist culture or by particular generational experiences. Rather, they exhibit what I call temporal complexity and temporal flexibility-creative uses of a variety of coexisting temporal references. My ethnographic material illustrates how such expressions of different forms of temporal reasoning structure social relations within and between different generations. Corresponding social groups are not simply divided by age, but are united through shared and heavily disputed negotiations of the post-Cold War era's contemporary crisis.