Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • "the uncanny" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Technological Animism

The Uncanny Personhood of Humanoid Machines

Kathleen Richardson

of technological animism. Fictional Animism, Automatons, and the Uncanny (Valley) In 2001, AI: Artificial Intelligence ( Spielberg 2001 ) was released in cinemas across the world. The story focuses on a robot child, David, and his existential crisis

Restricted access

Uncanny History

Temporal Topology in the Post-Ottoman World

Charles Stewart

to linear time ( Rosenberg and Grafton 2010: 244 ). The concept of ‘the uncanny’ reflects a further stage in the naturalization of linear temporal thought and also the effects of parallel Enlightenment tenets, such as objectivity (the value of

Restricted access

Pierre Fresnault-Deruelle

another, is manifested through the migration of certain significant motifs? Considering the uncanny atmosphere that pervades the story as much as the climate of the period (this was 1941), can we assume that Hergé wanted to convey to us, under the pretext

Restricted access

René Devisch

Diversely echoing Gail Weiss (1999) and Paul Stoller and Cheryll Olkes (1987), I hold that maleficent fetishes that sustain lethal sorcery shape and enact, yet pervert, their proper contours of embodied interactions and transactions. These interactions are being absorbed and consumed, if not devoured, by the sensual order of the uncanny and by forces of abjection. From my immersion in the life of the Yaka people in Kinshasa and south-west Congo, I am aiming at some endogenous understanding of how interacting bodies – or more precisely, intercorporeal awareness – can conform to (attune to) and become subordinated to (and implicated by) the frenzy of the transgressive and annihilating ‘forces’ mobilised by maleficent fetishes and lethal sorcerous violence. I contend that the mysterious field of sorcery and maleficent fetishes among the Yaka seems to foster among complicitous pairs some pre-reflective and interpersonal awareness of their body in the fold of (embracing) images, fantasies, experiential gestalts and desire of sorts. This primary entwinement of (inter)corporeal capacities, ‘forces’, cultural expectations and horizons of significance may help us to comprehend innovatively the sensual articulation of a genuine epistemology and a groping for moral economy in the very mood of transgression and perversion. This merging of desire, intercorporeality and sensing out of things paradoxically ties in with the pursuit as well as the obliteration of ethics. Such intermingling shows up in people’s manifold search to tame or, for other purposes, to stir up forms of unsettling, rupture, paradoxes, indeterminacy, categorial and ontological aporias, perversion or even destructive violence.

Restricted access

The Uncanniness of Missionary Others

A Discursive Analysis of a Century of Anthropological Writings on Missionary Ethnographers

Travis Warren Cooper

, uncanny figure in anthropological disciplinary consciousness. In critical psychoanalytic theory, theuncanny’ ( heimlich , in German) retains two lines of meaning or interpretation. On the one hand, the concept can denote familiarity, intimacy

Restricted access

Richard Brown

McEwan’s Saturday (2005) begins and ends in the edgy border zones between sleeping and waking, the public and the private, night and day. The main plot action concerns a violent threat to the domestic security of its protagonist Henry Perowne, while its setting draws on contemporary political events. It is a novel which can be seen to develop aspects of earlier works, including A Child in Time (1987), Black Dogs (1992) and Enduring Love (1997). As a novel set on a single day, it can be compared with a closely contemporary American work, Don de Lillo’s Cosmopolis (2003) and the modernist day novel such as James Joyce’s Ulysses (1922) and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway (1925). Saturday communicates its political themes in terms of family life, celebrates the power of the novel to explore both pathological and political states of the mind and draws on uncanny politicising effects in representing the everyday.

Restricted access

Julia de Kadt, Laurence Piper, Michael Lambert, Kevin A. Morrisson, Michael Phillips, and Lance Lachenicht

Political Topographies of the African State, by Catherine Boone Julia de Kadt

Toleration, Neutrality and Democracy, edited by Dario Castiglione and Catriona McKinnon Laurence Piper

The Culture of Toleration in Diverse Societies: Reasonable Tolerance, edited by Catriona McKinnon and Dario Castiglione Laurence Piper

Democracy, edited by David Estlund Laurence Piper

War and Gender, by Joshua S. Goldstein Michael Lambert

The Uncanny, by Nicholas Royle Kevin A. Morrisson

Political Reconciliation, by Andrew Schaap Michael Phillips

The Illusion of Conscious Will, by Daniel M. Wegner Lance Lachenicht

Restricted access

Rudi Visker

A few years ago, while reading Sartre’s ‘reflections on the Jewish question’ in the course of a seminar on Being and Nothingness,1 I was literally dumbfounded by the uncanny similarity between some of Sartre’s expressions and what I had written myself under the influence of authors like Lyotard or Lacan, whom I took to be his antipodes. The more I read, the less difference I saw and the more I underwent a kind of depersonalisation.

Restricted access

Cailleachs, Keens and Queens

Reconfiguring Gender and Nationality in the poetry of Eileán Ní Chuilleanáin, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Eavan Boland

Helen Kidd

In Irish writing the house is a familiar metaphor for nation, psyche, and community. Haunted with unquiet ghosts, it is frequently depicted as symptom of colonial repression and control, invoking the Famine, dispossession, dislocation, partition; the list, as with all colonial abuses, goes on and on. Freud usefully makes the connection between the uncanny (unheimlich) and the homely (heimlich)2 indicating the secondary meaning of heimlich as covered, concealed. Once the silences and (long) sufferings of colonisation are out in the open, gender issues, and the institution of home supported by these, which also rests on naturalised cover-ups – these continue to unsettle the discourses of home, nation and history.

Free access

It was horrible, but we live now

The experience of young German adults in everyday encounters with the Holocaust

Lisa J. Krieg

entanglements of their national pasts and family histories, and Gampel (2000) has focused on how Holocaust child survivors experience encounters with remnants of past memories in the everyday as sudden encounters with the uncanny. These authors contribute to