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Theatre and Ideology

Staging The Merchant of Venice at the Hungarian National Theatre in 1940 and 1986

Zoltán Imre

Venetian Jew] Apart from paraphrasing Hamlet, the Hungarian theatre critic Tamás Koltai posed these questions quite straightforwardly in his review of the performance of The Merchant of Venice in 1986. His questions referred to the basic problems of

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Gustavo H. Dalaqua

what Boal offers is precisely a theory and a practical scheme that attempt first and foremost to combine representation and democracy. 1 This article retrieves the practice of the Chamber in the Square (CIS) proposed by Boal in Legislative Theatre

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Özlem Özmen

Shakespeare’, 1 Lear constitutes a viable source for Pascal’s adaptation, which also deals with the theme of disillusionment by portraying a group of Yiddish theatre actors that witness the loss of interest in the Yiddish theatre specifically in New York

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Shylock and the Nazis

Continuation or Reinvention?

Alessandra Bassey

Eighty-five years ago, in 1933, Dr Walter Stang, a theatre critic and member of the National Socialist German Workers Party, claimed that ‘National socialism … would ensure the development of completely new forms in the German Theatre’. 1

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Shakespeare's Fools

A Piece in a Peacebuilding Mosaic

Maja Milatovic-Ovadia

In November 2017, Ratko Mladic, a war-time leader and a commander of the Bosnian Serb Army, was sentenced by the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal to life imprisonment for the genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the 1992–1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In the region the verdict was received with conflicting reactions, emphasising yet again how extensive the ethnic division is within the society. Through close analysis of the theatre project Shakespeare’s Comedies performed by ethnically segregated youth in Bosnia-Herzegovina, this article aims to understand how Shakespeare’s work functions as a vehicle to address the consequences of war and to support the complex process of reconciliation under circumstances in which the issues of war crimes cannot be tackled in a straightforward and direct manner. The study takes a cross-disciplinary approach to research, drawing from theory of reconciliation, applied theatre practice and comedy studies.

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Mark Ingram

Pascale Goetschel, Renouveau et décentralisation du théâtre 1945-1981 (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France [avec le concours du Comité d’histoire du ministère de la Culture et des Institutions culturelles], 2004).

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Reclaiming the Actress's Authority over Theatre Creation

The Autobiography of Polish Actress Irena Solska (1875–1958)

Natalia Yakubova

This article considers the autobiography of the famous Polish actress Irena Solska (1875-1958) as a response to the masculinisation of creativity in twentieth-century theatre, which was a result of the affirmation of the director-centred model. In her autobiography, Solska constructs the image of her creativity with the help of characteristics traditionally marked as 'feminine'. Taking into consideration the theatrical context of the 1930s to the 1950s, the period in which she wrote her text, I regard such a construction as subversive. Solska refused to conform to the new aesthetic norms of the period, which insisted on the dissociation of women's creativity from their embodiment and sexuality. She expressed nostalgia for the full creative status women artists enjoyed under the actor-centred paradigm, but which was lost as a result of the introduction of the director-centred model. Solska questioned the pejorative connotation of the actor-centred theatre as 'feminised' and, by purely literary means, reaffirmed such characteristics as embodiment, impulsiveness and disruptiveness.

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Laughter in the Ghetto

Cabarets from a Concentration Camp

Lisa Peschel

been accessible to scholars for decades, but most of the prisoners’ works for the theatre were thought lost. From 2004 to 2008, however, during my interviews with survivors who were involved in the cultural life of the ghetto, several previously unknown

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Christy Desmet

The Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon opened on 23 April 1879 with a performance of Much Ado About Nothing; sixty-five year old Helen Faucit, long semi-retired from the stage, played the role of Beatrice. This essay explores the cultural politics informing the event from the perspective of Faucit's involvement, exploring her significance to the performance and the performance's significance to her through a series of textual lenses - including theatre reviews, Faucit's personal correspondence, her critical work On Some of Shakespeare's Female Characters and Sir Theodore Martin's posthumous biography of his wife. From a public perspective, Faucit endowed the supposedly provincial town of Stratford, its festival and its new theatrical institution with national stature; from the actress's private perspective, the event was both a professional engagement and a community celebration among old and new friends, bringing together the different facets of her long personal engagement with Shakespeare.

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Benedict O'Donahoe

The autumn of 1998 saw a fiftieth anniversary revival of Sartre’s Les Mains sales at the Théâtre Antoine in Paris, complete with facsimile programme of its premiere, placing emphasis upon the chequered history of this controversial play. The review in Le Monde also privileged an account of the political context of the play’s creation over an assessment of the production’s virtues: ‘Nous regardons la photo un peu passée de ce qui nous avait secoués.’ This reception suggests that Sartre the dramatist is already remembered chiefly as the author of circumstantial and thesis plays whose interest depended largely upon their historical moment. It is noticeable that other pastmasters, more ‘past’ than Sartre – Molière, Racine, Feydeau – attracted greater critical attention in the Parisian rentrée of that year, as did one near-anagrammatic contemporary, Nathalie Sarraute.