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Religious Tourism

Analytical Routes through Multiple Meanings

Emerson Giumbelli

Translator : Jeffrey Hoff

detailed below. For now, it is sufficient to say that it is presented as a ‘religious tourism’ project, and one of its main supporters is a local association of ‘pilgrims’. ‘Religious tourism’ is a syntagma that may sound like a contradiction in terms—if it

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Mark C. J. Stoddart and Paula Graham

Introduction In the wake of the 1992 cod fishing moratorium, the provincial government of Newfoundland identified tourism as a key area for economic diversification in the province ( Government of Newfoundland and Labrador 1992 ). In the two decades

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Urban tourism via dispossession of oeuvres

Labor as a common denominator

Marc Morell

object (cf. Anonymous 2007 ; Delgado 2016 ; Domínguez Sánchez 2010 ). Behind all this there is a bigger political-economic picture. According to the World Tourism Organization, tourism is the fastest growing industry across the globe. In 2016, for

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From Exoticism to Authenticity

Textbooks during French Colonization and the Modern Literature of Global Tourism

Claudine Moïse

representations of the other. The recurrent presence of exoticism, especially that found in the literature of globalized tourism, shows that othering remains as an agenda for Western tourism, while at the same time retaining the lineaments of the exoticism of the

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“We Are a Traveling People”

Tourism, Travel Journalism, and the Construction of a Modern National Identity in Sweden

Emilia Ljungberg

article about tourism. The article was titled “We Are a Traveling People,” and the main theme was an evaluation of the Swede as a traveler. In a humorous tone the journalist claimed that the Swede is a popular guest abroad who is not too stingy but who is

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Beyond the Glittering Golden Buddha Statues

Difference and Self-transformation through Buddhist Volunteer Tourism in Thailand

Brooke Schedneck

spiritual vacations have become a meaningful addition to the offerings within Thailand’s tourism industry, as evidenced by the variety and diversity of opportunities to learn about and practice Buddhism offered to travelers. Teaching English in temple

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Smita Yadav

Sites of pilgrimage and heritage tourism are often sites of social inequality and volatility that are impaired by hostilities between historical, ethnic, and competing religious discourses of morality, personhood, and culture, as well as between imaginaries of nationalism and citizenship. Often these pilgrim sites are much older in national and global history than the actual sovereign nation-state in which they are located. Pertinent issues to do with finance—such as regimes of taxation, livelihoods, and the wealth of regional and national economies—underscore these sites of worship. The articles in this special issue engage with prolix travel arrangement, accommodation, and other aspects of heritage tourism in order to understand how intangible aspects of such tourism proceed. But they also relate back to when and how these modern infrastructures transformed the pilgrimage and explore what the emerging discourses and practices were that gave newer meanings to neoliberal pilgrimages. The different case studies presented in this issue analyze the impact of these journeys on the pilgrims’ own subjectivities—especially with regard to the holy sites being situated in their imaginations of historical continuity and discontinuity and with regard to their transformative experiences of worship—using both modern and traditional infrastructures.

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Tourism and the revolutionary new man

The specter of jineterismo in late 'special period' Cuba

Mette Louise Berg

Cuba's economic restructuring in the past decade has involved the country's reinsertion into the global tourist market. One of the undesired consequences of the new tourism based economy has been the phenomenon of jineterismo, literally horseback riding, but used to indicate hustling or prostitution. Prostitution is associated with the pre-revolution era and is therefore a sensitive issue for the socialist government. At the same time, sex tourism has become an important source of hard currency income. This article proposes to see jineterismo as a complex social phenomenon that brings issues of race, class, gender and nation into play, ultimately challenging the revolutionary narrative of social and racial equality.

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Czech Balneotherapy

Border Medicine and Health Tourism

Amy Speier

This essay exemplifies a particular approach to the field of health tourism, whereby the anthropology of tourism and medical anthropology can be used in conjunction. The serious business of healing is not usually associated with the pleasures of relaxation; however, Czech spas have historically been sites of both healing and leisure for visitors. Building on the suggestion of Veijola and Jokinen (1994), the body of the tourist is made the centre of this study. The bodies of patient-tourists at Czech health spas undergo various healing regimens, and their bodies signify a negotiation of national and cultural identities. Just as Bunzl (2000) considers bodies as constituting European cultural landscapes, this essay considers the ways in which German patient bodies at Czech health spas constitute a changing national, political and cultural relationship at a 'border' of Europe.

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“Hot Guys” in Tel Aviv

Pride Tourism in Israel

Amit Kama and Yael Ram

follows. First, a literature review presents various themes regarding LGBTQ+ tourism in general and specifically in Israel, where geohistorical circumstances encompass questions of equality, human rights, and an ongoing geopolitical conflict. The