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Transit Migration in Niger

Stemming the Flows of Migrants, but at What Cost?

Sébastien Moretti

policy makers to such movements has been an increasing externalization of their restrictive migration policies to stem the movements of people and to shift the responsibility for preventing irregular immigration to so-called transit states. As the most

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Dirty Work, Dangerous Others

The Politics of Outsourced Immigration Enforcement in Mexico

Wendy Vogt

” being done on behalf of the European Union to stop migrants from crossing the Mediterranean ( McCormick 2017 ; Tinti 2017 ). The concept of “dirty work” thus presents an interesting point of analysis for scholars of transit. An exciting body of

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When Transit States Pursue Their Own Agenda

Malaysian and Indonesian Responses to Australia's Migration and Border Policies

Antje Missbach and Gerhard Hoffstaedter

Introduction Although little has been written about the political roles of so-called transit states in contemporary securitized migration management, it seems to be widely assumed that transit states follow the orders of their more powerful

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Managing a Multiplicity of Interests

The Case of Irregular Migration from Libya

Melissa Phillips

( Andersson 2016a ). This article investigates the way in which these threats are dealt with by external actors using the Central Mediterranean route as an example, specifically focusing on Libya as a transit country and departure point for irregular migration

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“Looking for One's Life”

Trapped Mobilities and Adventure in Morocco

Sébastien Bachelet

restricted mobility of migrants from Central and West Africa trapped in Morocco, often portrayed as a country of transit. Although migrants’ aspirations are often projected northward of the Mediterranean, I argue that it is necessary not to reify the link

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Place Making in Transit

Literary Interventions at the Airport and in the Underground

Emma Eldelin and Andreas Nyblom

Spaces of transit and transportation are often thought of as one-dimensional and as defined by their functionality and rationality, but recent literary texts challenge such preconceptions by representing those spaces as multidimensional and meaningful. In this article, we examine literature through the lens of place making, seeking to understand in what ways literary representations are involved in renegotiations of transit space. Addressing two generic spaces of transit—the underground and the airport—we analyze a body of texts generated through initiatives relating to the London Underground and Heathrow Airport respectively. Arguing that literature contributes to a processual understanding of place, we conclude that literary texts should be considered as instances of place making, and thus deserve serious consideration in research.

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James Ryan

This article reviews recent works of the urban history of Istanbul and considers new frameworks for the history of public transit in that city. It suggests that through new understandings of the transformation of public space, we can reconceptualize transit history as urban history writ small.

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Sarah Frohardt-Lane

This article considers recent scholarship on the social dimensions of mass transit in the United States. It focuses on historical struggles to make urban conveyances serve the public and demonstrates that access to mass transit has been continually contested through legal challenges, economic boycotts, and everyday practice.

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'Greater good' in transit

The unwieldy career of a Swedish rail tunnel project

Åsa Boholm

Large-scale technological projects are born as visions among politicians and leaders of industry. For such visions to become real, they must be transformed from a virtual existence in the minds of their creators to a reality that can be accepted, even welcomed, by the public, not least by the communities who will become neighbors to those projects. Democracy implies that political decisions over the expenditure of public funds should answer not merely to the partial interests of stakeholders but should be accountable to the 'greater good' of society at large. Since a technological project materializes in what Latour calls a 'variable ontology-world', the greater good associated with it can be expected to be dynamic and shifting. The Hallandsås railway tunnel in southwestern Sweden illustrates how the very premises of the project's organizational logic have changed over time, the discourse of the greater good moving from an economical focus to an environmental one.

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Introduction

Reconceptualizing Transit States in an Era of Outsourcing, Offshoring, and Obfuscation

Antje Missbach and Melissa Phillips

are deemed to be “transit states.” In brief, transit states can be understood as countries through which migrants and asylum seekers try to pass on their way to another destination country. State officials from destination countries in the global