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Fighting Fire with Fire

Resistance to Transitional Justice in Bahrain

Ciara O’Loughlin

The purpose of this article is to explore the nature of resistance to transitional justice in Bahrain. To date, much academic attention has been directed toward measuring the effects of transitional justice mechanisms on dependent variables such as

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Adopting a Resistance Lens

An Exploration of Power and Legitimacy in Transitional Justice

Julie Bernath and Sandra Rubli

Within transitional justice scholarship of the past ten years, “power” and “legitimacy” have increasingly become objects of study, in particular for scholars taking a critical stance to a normative conceptualization and implementation of

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Corinna Mullin and Ian Patel

To me, this is cinema. … Some players and officials want to reduce our transitional justice misfortunes and sufferings to mere historical anecdotes that we have to forget before any accountability and compensation. … Most associations, especially

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Analyzing Resistance to Transitional Justice

What Can We Learn from Hybridity?

Briony Jones

transitional justice this can include a managed form of hybridity, deliberately bringing together the international and local in order to create more legitimate mechanisms and processes, or it can include reference to trying to understand more spontaneous forms

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Perspectives from the Ground

Colonial Bureaucratic Violence, Identity, and Transitional Justice in Canada

Jaymelee J. Kim

during Canada’s transitional justice (TJ) process—an experience antithetical to the framework’s primary goals of justice, accountability, and reconciliation. Her lived reality exemplifies that of Indigenous survivors trying to understand, navigate, and

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Space of Hope for Lebanon’s Missing

Promoting Transitional Justice through a Digital Memorial

Erik Van Ommering and Reem el Soussi

digital memorial “Transitional justice” is a term now widely adopted to capture the efforts of societies to come to terms with legacies of war, human rights violations, repression, or terror. The concept has gained prominence in post–Cold War scholarly

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Using International Criminal Law to Resist Transitional Justice

Legal Rupture in the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Mikael Baaz and Mona Lilja

showcase of liberal post–Cold War transitional justice and state building, the Agreements on a Comprehensive Political Settlement of the Cambodia Conflict (henceforth the Paris Peace Agreements) were signed in Paris on 23 October 1991 under UN supervision

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Democratization of Perpetration

Human Rights, Transitional Justice, and Memories of Resistance in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Amy Rothschild

This article examines the effects of human rights and transitional justice on memories of Timor-Leste’s resistance to the Indonesian occupation, which lasted from 1975 to 1999. Data comes from ethnographic fieldwork in Timor, centered around remembrance of two major acts of resistance: an armed uprising in 1983 and a peaceful demonstration in 1991. The article argues that in Timor, an “apolitical” human rights has caused a post-conflict “democratization of perpetration”, in that similar culpability is assigned to all those who caused suffering in the conflict with Indonesia through physical violence, irrespective of context. Transitional justice has thus expanded the category of perpetrator in Timor, to include some who legally used armed resistance against Indonesian rule. Studies of violence have belatedly turned toward examining perpetrators of state terror; this article examines how discourses of human rights and transitional justice shape perceptions of those who resist state terror with violence.

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Introduction

Rethinking Resistance to Transitional Justice

Briony Jones and Thomas Brudholm

Transitional justice, as a process and set of mechanisms designed to address human rights violations of the past, is a project of transformation. Designed to deal with legacies of past wrongs, transitional justice ideally aims to address their root

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Patrick Lenta

The following paper is a discussion of justice as a sign in transition, a sign whose meanings in post-apartheid South Africa must be legitimated by appeal to conditions radically different from those that prevailed under apartheid. I wish to explore the nature of the transformation of justice from the context of apartheid to emergent postapartheid conditions and to do so by focusing on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (the TRC) as an example of what can be called ‘transitional justice’. A common view of the TRC is that its rules for the implementation of amnesty and other related matters should be evaluated in the light of ‘ideal types’ of justice. The TRC must fall short of such ideal types, since its offer of qualified amnesty to perpetrators of gross human rights violations in exchange for complete honesty about such violations will be understood as an exigency which dispenses with a crucial feature of justice, namely retribution.