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Shiran Avni

. It is therefore impossible to detach Modern Hebrew from its biblical antecedent, especially in literature. This is most evident in literary translations into Hebrew, where the biblical language generates and provokes meaning and intertextual allusion

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The Task of the Hebrew Translation

Reading into Othello’s Indian/Iudean Crux in the First Hebrew Translation

Eran Tzelgov

The 1870s mark the first translations of complete Shakespeare plays into Hebrew: Ithiel ha-Kushi mi-Vineẓya (Othello , 1874) and Ram ve-Yaʿel (Romeo and Juliet , 1878). These translations, by the Jewish convert to Christianity Isaac Edward

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Translated Objects

The Olov Janse Case

Johan Hegardt and Anna Källén

This article explores the movements of archaeological and ethnographic objects and museum collections connected with the Swedish-born archaeologist and ethnographer Olov R. T. Janse (1892–1985). Janse pursued a cosmopolitan career in the years between 1920 and 1960, in and between the national contexts of Sweden, France, Indochina, the Philippines, and the United States, where he found himself in different political contexts such as colonialism, nationalism, and the Cold War. He initiated object exchanges between French and Swedish museums, and he collected archaeological and ethnographic objects from Indochina and the Philippines for museums in Sweden, France, and the United States. The complexity of object movements in the wake of Olov Janse's career suggests that we should think and talk about object mobility in terms of translation rather than simple transmission. In seven sections, each exploring one chapter of Janse's life, we discuss how changes in world politics became entangled with changes in Janse's own position as an archaeologist and ethnographer, affecting the movements of objects and contributing to an active translation of their meaning.

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Translating the Concept of Experiment in the Late Eighteenth Century

From the English Philosophical Context to the Greek-Speaking Regions of the Ottoman Empire

Eirini Goudarouli and Dimitris Petakos

During the past few decades, the issue of conceptual change as a result of the act of translation has become a primary source of investigation in history-related research projects. Theories concerning the interrelation of the act of translation, the

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Adrian van den Hoven

Sarah Richmond’s translation makes an important contribution to Sartrean scholarship. L’Etre et le néant was first translated by Hazel Barnes in 1956 but it contained various errors. Richmond also had access to the internet and to Sartre’s French and German sources. Her edition also contains an Introduction and a ‘Notes on the translation’ section.

Sartre published his work in 1943 and, unable to access all the works he cited, he often did so from memory. He also adopted certain translators’ neologisms: for example, Corbin’s translation of Heidegger’s Qu’est-ce que la métaphysique? , and when he quoted Nietzsche, he used two different translations, and he quotes Spinoza using a text by Hegel. He quotes a line from the playwright Beaumarchais without clarifying the context.

Sarah Richmond deals with many of these problems and also notes that the French gender system can be problematic. Also, Sartre’s neologisms rendered finding English equivalents difficult. This is an excellent translation.

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Frans Ciappara

On 16 October 1609 a group of relics, including a piece of the true cross that the Spaniard Fra Juan Benegas had brought from Rome to Malta, was translated from Valletta to Rabat in a national procession. Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt (1601

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Translating Islam into Georgian

The Question of Georgian Muslim Identity in Contemporary Adjara

Ricardo Rivera

This forum piece provides a brief discussion of the mediation of religious and ethnic identity through language in Adjara, an autonomous region of southwestern Georgia. The piece considers the emergence of a consolidated ‘Georgian Muslim’ identity in the post-Soviet period. It thus sheds light on how language acts as a site for the navigation of religious and historical difference in Adjara.

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Adriana X. Jacobs

approximate the truth of human experiences. In this article, I will extend this question to the translated text: how does a translation compare with its original? In the case of Shakespeare, how do retranslations of his work (of which there are many, in many

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An Unpublished Manuscript by Durkheim

‘On the General Physics of Law and Morality, 4th Year of the Course, 1st Lecture, December 2, 1899, Course Outline: On Penal Sanctions’

Émile Durkheim, François Pizarro Noël and Ronjon Paul Datta

often-confused questions: penalty and responsibility. Acknowledgements This translation and the translators’ notes are by Ronjon Paul Datta and François Pizarro Noël, and reflect the equal contributions of both. Notes 1 Translators’ note. The original

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Concerning Durkheim's 1899 Lecture ‘On Penal Sanctions’

Introduction, Translation Notes, and Comments

Ronjon Paul Datta and François Pizarro Noël

This article provides an introduction to our translation of Durkheim's 1899 lecture entitled ‘Course Outline: On Penal Sanctions’. A typescript French version of these lecture notes, handwritten by Durkheim, was prepared by François Pizarro Noël and