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The Concept of Civilization in Spain, 1754-2005

From Progress to Identify

Javier Fernández Sebastián

The aim of this article is to give an account of the main uses of the concept of Civilization in Spain, in political and intellectual debates, from its origins in the mid-eighteenth century to the present. In the Spanish case, the evolution of this notion is initially marked by the special circumstances of a country relatively backward in comparison with some of the principal "enlightened" European countries, but at the same time an Imperial monarchy, possessing very extensive territories inhabited by people considered as yet "uncivilized". Furthermore, the long struggles in the medieval Iberian peninsula between Christians and Muslims also had a strong influence on certain characteristics of the political uses of the concept of civilization in modern Spain. Recently, the impact of the supposed "Clash of Civilizations" has added a new twist to the range of meanings of the word, employed more and more frequently in a cultural-religious sense. So, between the Enlightenment and post-modernity, the notion of civilization would have moved away from the sphere of Progress to a very different conceptual space: that of Identity.

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Towards a Comparative History of Concepts

Civilisation and beschaving

Pim den Boer

Building upon an introductory discussion on linguistic exchange - the problem of missing words - and the emergence of transnational concepts, this article consists of a comparative study of the history of the concept of civilisation in some major European languages and the concept of beschaving in Dutch, the closest translation to civilisation in that language. According to the author, the particular and independent conceptual evolution of beschaving should be in part explained by the early development of a modern socio-economic structure in Holland.

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“It's a Big Umbrella”

Uncertainty, Pentecostalism, and the Integration of Zimbabwe Exemption Permit Immigrants in Johannesburg, South Africa

Tinashe Chimbidzikai

imagined global community is represented in the mental image of a global family of God, which also serves as a transnational concept of belonging ( Schüler 2008 ). Such imagined communities are constructed in what Sebastian Schüler refers to as a “third

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Nationalism and Internationalism Reconciled

British Concepts for a New World Order during and after the World Wars

Antero Holmila and Pasi Ihalainen

kind of world order were supportive of each other, as “the prosperity of every country is the prosperity of each.” 36 This rising transnational concept of what we can call “nationalistic internationalism” suggested that national interests should be

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Ottoman Conceptual History

Challenges and Prospects

Alp Eren Topal and Einar Wigen

Language Reform, which is a related issue. Geoffrey Lewis, The Turkish Language Reform: A Catastrophic Success (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999). 30 Şerif Mardin, “Conceptual Fracture,” in Transnational Concepts Transfers and the Challenge of

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Mobilizing Malian-Diasporic Identities

How Southern News Websites Facilitate Non-sedentarist Discourses on African Migration

Syntia Hasenöhrl

territory. Other expressions stressed the transnational concept of “Malians” when they referred to “Malians within and outside [of Mali].” Relational nominations emphasized the ongoing connection of Malian society with members of the Malian diaspora as in

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Book Reviews

Kristen Ghodsee, Hülya Adak, Elsa Stéphan, Chiara Bonfiglioli, Ivan Stankov, Rumiana Stoilova, Rochelle Goldberg Ruthchild, Mara Lazda, Adrienne Harris, Ayşe Durakbaşa, Lex Heerma van Voss, Lejila Mušić, Zdeňka Kalnická, Sylwia Kuźma-Markowska, Evguenia Davidova, Tsoneva Tsoneva, Georgi Medarov, and Irina Genova

and transnational concepts to fit their local needs. April Haynes demonstrates how Black young women in the US South spoke out for sexual and racial equality, introducing principles of Black Power into existing YWCA programs on sex education. Eileen