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Trending Transfers

A Decade of New Mobility Studies through the Lens of Transmodality, Transnationalism, and Transdisciplinarity

Gijs Mom

transnational or international approach.” At the same time the authors of the overview opined that the Journal of Transport History “is not a reflection of research activities in the wider field,” which the authors attributed to a problem of language. 10 A

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Toward Transnationalism

A Reading of Life of Pi

Supriya Agarwal

. In fact, history does not speak of the idea of nationhood as an inherent attribute of humanity; it is rather a modern notion, and Martel, in many ways breaking this theoretical construction, is moving toward the thought of transnationalism. I have

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International Cooperation, Transnational Circulation

Escape, Evasion, and Resistance in France, 1940–1945

Valerie Deacon

Belgium, France, or the Netherlands. From enlisting in the air forces to training, running missions, evading capture in Europe, and returning to England, their stories represent some of the clearest transnational trajectories of the Second World War. Men

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Transnational Human Rights Litigation

A Means of Obtaining Effective Remedy Abroad?

Angela Lindt

Corporate impunity for human rights violations is increasingly questioned, contested, and opposed. Transnational corporations (TNCs) can no longer be sure that crimes they commit will remain unobserved, even when they occur in connection with the

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Global Heimat

(Post)Migrant Productions of Transnational Space

Regina Römhild

With reference to anthropologist Ina-Maria Greverus’ pioneering analyses of human-environment relations since the 1970s, the article pushes the idea of Heimat further to the more processual concept of Beheimatung. This is especially relevant for an anthropology of the transnational worlds of (post-)migrant societies with their current negotiation of cross-border migration in the present and concerning colonial objects from the past in museums.

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Concrete transnationalism?

Bridge building in the new economy

Orvar Löfgren

In 2000 the bridge across Öresund linking Denmark and Sweden was finally opened. The bridge may appear as a classic, modernist piece of planning and technology, but the actual construction of the bridge coincided with the boom years of 'the new economy'. The ways in which the construction was organized and staged very much came to mirror some important trends of that new economy, including many of its buzz words. Over the years it became more and more unclear what actually was going on: a bridge construction or EU-invocations of a future transnational metropolis. This bridge project was densely inhabited by visions, dreams and expectations: there was so much this bridge could do. The article follows the various stages of the bridge project, from early dreams and plans, over the actual construction phase, to the grand opening ceremonies and finally the difficult transition into an everyday transport machine. I discuss the ways in which engineering and imagineering became intertwined and also how a transnational project like this made the nation state more visible and tangible.

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Ernst van der Wal

The negotiation of and resistance to national borders are central themes in the stories and images that lesbian, bisexual, gay, and transgender refugees produce in a contemporary global environment where forms of transnational movement is of

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Politicizing the Transnational

On Implications for Migrants, Refugees, and Scholarship

Riina Isotalo

This article discusses the politicization of the transnational paradigm in terms of development and security, refugee and migrant regimes, and transnational practices. The analysis makes two principal arguments. The first is that diasporas and mobility in general have been both securitized and developmentalized. These two processes are intertwined but also contradictory. While migration is seen as a development resource, 'uncontrolled' population flows—particularly of refugees—are looked upon as security threats by states and policy makers. This duo-faceted approach is at the root of the politicization of the transnational paradigm. The second argument of this text is that this politicization and the neo-liberal mega-trend are also entwined, despite the fact that the scholars who introduced transnationalism to migration research saw it as reflecting a process of globalization 'from below'.

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Amy Kallander

a heterosexual public sphere. Expanding the argument to France, I turn to the politicization of transnational romance and anti-immigrant racism targeting North African men in France, to indicate the geocultural and racial fault lines of national

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(Trans)National X-Factor

Patrick Stewart, Britishness and the Promotion of X-Men

Rayna Denison

The terrain and identity of the blockbuster, particularly the subset represented by X-Men, are among the least mapped and consequently misunderstood of Hollywood phenomena. Though the entertainment media deploy the term blockbuster without difficulty across almost every genre of film, academically the term has been more elusive. Previous to Julian Stringer's edited collection Movie Blockbusters, the blockbuster had usually been conceived as an unproblematically American phenomenon. Stringer's attempt to map the blockbuster's terrain usefully brings in the notion of nationality, which will form the focus of this analysis. However, it also begs an explanation of the blockbuster as it will be understood here. This discussion will use John Tomlinson's formulation of globalisation as complex connectivity as the basis for a more flexible framework within which to view the blockbuster film. Thus this article will seek to make sense of the flows of culture represented in X-Men, not as emanating from a central 'American' locus, but rather as shifting around what David Morley and Kevin Robins would term a global-local nexus. In this way the transnational and the national will both be shown to play a role in dispersing elements of films (and indeed this might be extended to other 'global' products) to the maximum number of potential audiences worldwide.