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In Government and Scientists We Trust

Compliance during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the Federal Republic of Germany

Ross Campbell

public and private spaces. These were presented as protective measures designed to alleviate the risk to public health, and all were urged to follow the restrictions in language that emphasized trust in the government's management of the crisis. This

Open access

From Vulnerability to Trust

Personal Encounters and Bordering Processes in the British Refugees Welcome Movement

Pierre Monforte and Gaja Maestri

the centrality of the principle of trust in these encounters and in the broader politics of border management. From this perspective, our analysis sheds light on the forms of engagement that go beyond humanitarianism—which can be defined as

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Humanitarian technologies of trust

Julie Billaud

Trust in humanitarian action’ was the top item on the agenda of the 33rd International Conference of the Red Cross which took place in Geneva from 9 to 12 December 2019. The reason for such a thematic choice was, according to a statement

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Trust, Reflexivity and Dependence

A 'Social Systems Theory' Analysis in/of Medicine

Paul Ward

Given the centrality of 'trust' in both the Theory of Social Quality and as a central motif of life in late modernity, this paper focuses attention on public (mist)trust in social systems and the potential ramifications of engagement with medical services, in addition to feelings of social exclusion and disembeddedness. Using data from a qualitative study of lay perceptions of local primary health care services, the paper reveals the complex and often contradictory ways in which trust is won, developed and lost. In addition, mistrust in local general practitioners (GPs) was found to be a factor of mistrust in a variety of social systems, organisations and institutions of government, rather than solely related to mistrust of either the GPs or the medical system. Nevertheless, there was not a widespread abandonment of the use of GPs or Western medicine, which may partly be explained by the perceived dependence of these people these people on the medical system. Overall, generalised mistrust existed at both inter-personal and systems-based levels and was levied at a variety of social systems and institutions of governance – mistrust was a pervading dimension of life in this community.

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Investigating Australians' Trust

Findings from a National Survey

Samantha B. Meyer, Tini C. N. Luong, Paul R. Ward, George Tsourtos, and Tiffany K. Gill

Trust has been identified as an indicator within Social Quality theory. As an important component of social quality, trust has become increasingly important in modern society because literature suggests that trust in a number of democratic countries is declining. Modern technologies and specialties are often beyond the understanding of lay individuals and thus, the need for trusting relations between lay individuals and organizations/individuals has grown. The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which Australians (dis)trust individuals and organizations/institutions. A national postal survey was conducted with 1,044 respondents recruited using the electronic white pages directory. Findings from multivariate analyses suggest that income, age, sex, and health status are associated with trust in groups of individuals and trust in organizations/institutions. The findings highlight populations where trust needs to be (re)built. Future government policy and practice should utilize these findings as a means of facilitating social quality.

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The Impact of Trust on the Quality of Participation in Development

The Case of Ukraine

Tadashi Hirai

continue to exist even if group membership changes over time. Yet, it would be unrealistic to expect that all inequalities in the power structure can be eliminated. One strategy for escaping this quandary may be to enhance trust in societal relationships

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Violence, Rumor, and Elusive Trust in Mocímboa da Praia, Mozambique

Ana Margarida Sousa Santos

continued circulation of rumors can act as a deterrent to the establishment of peaceful trust relationships between political factions. Mariano's worries for his friend were born out of personal experience. During the riots that shook Mocímboa in September

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Trust and Social Cohesion, the Key to Reconcile Thailand's Future

Thawilwadee Bureekul and Stithorn Thananithichot

Research from various countries demonstrates that trust builds social cohesion and conflicts may be solved as a result. Many alternatives for reconciliation in various countries have been studied and introduced to Thailand. However, the implementation of a reconciliation policy in Thailand seems to be impossible without having the atmosphere of peace building and specifically, trust building. This study aims to measure trust and discuss factors that may be problematic for establishing social cohesion, explaining why the process of reconciliation cannot be successful without trust building. The data from the Social Quality survey conducted by King Prajadhipok's Institute in late 2009 was used. This study finds that Thai society is still fragile because of the decreasing trust among people as well as confidence in various institutions, particularly political institutions.

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Relations of Trust, Questions about Expectations

Reflections on a Photography Project with Young South Africans

Oliver Pattenden

This article stems from my doctoral research, which considers moral contestation relating to education in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Overall, I outline a case for working with young people: addressing asymmetrical institutional and generational relations of power in order to enrich the knowledge generated by research. My focus is a project entitled My Future, which involved approximately forty learners drawing diagrams and using disposable cameras to produce representations of their moral judgements. Notable distinctions between data gathered during two stages of fieldwork, of differing durations, are analysed with reference to my relations with interlocutors and related institutionalised and public discourses of morality. Using the concept of trust, which is established during exchanges of mutually beneficial sociality, I argue that how we understand others depends upon what they expect from us and what we expect of them.

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Introduction

Technologies and infrastructures of trust

Anna Weichselbraun, Shaila Seshia Galvin, and Ramah McKay

This special issue develops a critical anthropology of trust, and inquires into the technologies, infrastructures, and material practices that accompany efforts to identify, enunciate, and stabilise it. As concerns with ‘fake news’—from COVID-19