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Charlotte Prové, Denise Kemper, and Salma Loudiyi

Over recent decades, we have witnessed an increase in the number of urban agriculture initiatives (UAIs) across the Western world. The understanding of urban agriculture (UA) has shifted from urban food production practices in and around cities for

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From Urban Agriculture to Urban Food

Food System Analysis Based on Interaction Between Research, Policy, and Society

Heidrun Moschitz, Jan Landert, Christian Schader, and Rebekka Frick

Urban Agriculture in the Urban Food System Urban agriculture practice involves a new way of thinking about food, including a critique of the predominant food system. It plays a major role in making food visible and can thus support a general

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Introduction

Civil Society and Urban Agriculture in Europe

Mary P. Corcoran and Joëlle Salomon Cavin

This special issue is devoted to how European civil society, working from the ground up, helps to conceive, create, and cultivate diverse forms of urban agriculture (UA). The articles that form this special issue demonstrate an explicit concern with

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Marian Simon-Rojo, Inés Morales Bernardos, and Jon Sanz Landaluze

Expectations about food as a key vector of social transformation have soared in recent years, and increasingly attention is being paid to food movements and urban agriculture 1 and their potential to reassert citizen (collective) control and to

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The Politics of Greening the City

The Case of the Bostan of Kuzguncuk, Istanbul

Alice Genoud

the number of urban agricultural spaces was linked to a process of creation of public parks. Parks were first constructed near the Bosphorus or the Golden Horn and quickly became models for other district municipalities ( Gloor and Karaman 2012 ). The

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The Incredible Edible Movement

People Power, Adaptation, and Challenges in Rennes (France) and Montreal (Canada)

Giulia Giacchè and Lya Porto

phenomenon of UPA and urban agriculture (UA) ( Optiz et al. 2016 ) there is not a consensus in the literature. We consider UA as a phenomenon of agriculture influenced and characterized by the proximity of the city ( Pearson et al. 2010 ) and present in intra

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Attila Tóth, Barbora Duží, Jan Vávra, Ján Supuka, Mária Bihuňová, Denisa Halajová, Stanislav Martinát, and Eva Nováková

debates on urban agriculture in Europe, we conclude that the rich knowledge base of postcommunist societies in Central and Eastern Europe is neither well researched nor utilized. These regions tend to be on the periphery of research, despite their

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Cultivating Civic Ecology

A Photovoice Study with Urban Gardeners in Lisbon, Portugal

Krista Harper and Ana Isabel Afonso

to play out in food movements such as urban agriculture ( DeLind 2011 ; Guthman 2008 ), or the potential for urban gardens to be co-opted as a form of neoliberal governance, replacing public investment in city services with voluntarism ( Pudup 2008

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Slum politics

Community leaders, everyday needs, and utopian aspirations in Recife, Brazil

Martijn Koster and Pieter A. de Vries

This article envisages slum dwellers' politics in Recife, Brazil as a realm of possibility in which care and recognition are central. Community leaders are its main facilitators as articulators of slum dwellers' needs and aspirations. The article's notion of slum politics is an elaboration of Chatterjee's (2004) ideas on popular politics as a “politics of the governed.“ Yet the article critiques the governmentality perspective for its inability to envisage a politics of hope and possibility. It distinguishes among slum politics, governmental politics (projects and programs), and electoral politics (voting), which are entwined and interdependent, but different. Zooming in on a community leader's urban agriculture project, the article argues that this project, which from an outsiders' perspective may be considered non-viable, provided slum dwellers with possibilities to strive for community solidarity and personal recognition. Slum politics, the article concludes, is about claiming the right to be counted and recognized, and about the care for the other.

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Inventing Eco-Cycle

A Social Enterprise Approach to Sustainability Education

Sandy Smith-Nonini

Abstract

This article discusses lessons learned from a social enterprise project supporting sustainability education in central North Carolina (U.S.A.). Since 2011, Eco-Cycle,1 a retail shop featuring creative-reuse has provided support for a community meeting space that offers weekly environmental education workshops. Many approaches to social justice-oriented green initiatives in the United States emulate urban agriculture models and tend to be grant-dependent in early years, only achieving economic sustainability with difficulty. In contrast, our non-profit co-op of upcycler crafters and vintage vendors grew out of production and marketing of upcycled rain barrels, based on a social enterprise approach rather than a traditional model. I discuss the stepping-stones to this venture, which originated through a neighbourhood energy conservation initiative, followed by alliance-building with non-profits to promote green job creation. I relate the complications and surprising forms of synergism emerging from the social enterprise approach to social theory on cooperatives and community-based development models.

1Eco-Cycle is a pseudonym.