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The iAnimal Film Series

Activating Empathy Through Virtual Reality

Holly Cecil

Virtual reality (VR) technology often is associated with videogaming and cinema as a digital medium rendering synthetic worlds more believable. In this article, however, I explore its employment in nonfiction formats as an immersive tool to expose

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Seeing Green

Visual Technology, Virtual Reality, and the Experience of War

Jose N. Vasquez

This article addresses the question of how visual technology—night vision, thermal imaging, and virtual reality—has changed the experience of war for both combatants and non-combatants. Video and still images are analyzed to draw out some of the phenomenological aspects of how technology mitigates the perception of combat and its resultant casualties. I argue that while visual technology makes the experience of war more intimate, it also generates psychological distance between the viewer and the viewed. Weapons equipped with visual technology facilitate war crimes by dehumanizing the individuals being targeted and filtering the carnage these weapons produce.

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"Pseudo-Sousveillance"

(Re)imagining Immigration Narratives and Surveillance Practices by Experiencing "Use of Force"

Kellie Marin

This article introduces the concept of “pseudo-sousveillance” as simulated sousveillance practices created by the sensory environments of immersive technologies. To advance this concept, I analyze the virtual reality (VR) experience “Use of Force” that immerses participants within the scene of the night during which immigrant Anastasio Hernandez Rojas was beaten by border patrol officers at the San Ysidro Port of Entry. I argue that the pseudo-sousveillance practices of cellphone recording and surveillance from above enlist users to be active participants in resisting dominant surveillance practices by constructing alternative narratives about immigrant experiences, exposing the overreach of the border patrol, and revealing the limits of surveillance in immigration control. I then discuss the implications that pseudo-sousveillance has for rethinking the rhetorical power of emerging technologies and sousveillance in a surveillant age.

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Editor's Introduction

The Affective Modalities of Media and Technology

Andrew J. Ball

through the strategic use of embodied affective experience. Three essays in the issue focus on new and emerging technology. In, “The iAnimal Film Series: Activating Empathy Through Virtual Reality,” Holly Cecil examines the potential power of virtual

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Jane Stadler

” (48), Plantinga extends the argument that stories have adaptive benefits to embrace novels and even virtual reality. Twice (on pages 23 and 48), he quotes literary scholar Jonathan Gottschall, who writes in The Storytelling Animal that “nature

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Democratizing the Digital Collection

New Players and New Pedagogies in Three-Dimensional Cultural Heritage

Jane-Heloise Nancarrow

nontraditional methodologies relating to three-dimensional digital museum collections can renegotiate the material properties of objects, and allow for experimentation within heritage, anthropology, and archaeology. Yet while digital modeling, virtual reality

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On Shock Therapy

Modernist Aesthetics and American Underground Film

William Solomon

will gesture toward a surprisingly compatible (though much more contemporary) topic: the military’s exploration of the possibility that virtual reality, in the form of video games, might help prepare soldiers for the physiological and neurological

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The Self On-Screen

Pavel Pyś Reflects on The Body Electric

Pavel Pyś

United Kingdom. Responding to this decision, Hansen created DICKGIRL 3D(X) (2016), a work that features EVA v3.0, a royalty-free avatar that the artist sourced through TurboSquid. Experienced via Oculus Rift in virtual reality (VR), the hypersexualized

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Haptic Mediations

Intergenerational Kinship in the Time of COVID-19

Bob Simpson

manoeuvres which add physical sensation to the experience of virtual reality. Here we are on the road to what David Howes (2004) has referred to as ‘hyperesthesia’, the enhancement of commodities and the experience of consumption by elaborating their

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“Mind the Gap”

Between Movies and Mind, Affective Neuroscience, and the Philosophy of Film

Jane Stadler

and Plantinga, but also because with the increasing prominence of immersive technologies such as virtual reality I believe his assessment of the role of simulation in moral imagination is the next problem that cognitive media studies and those of us