Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,627 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Projecting the Colors of Vision

Wendy Haslem

experiments in narrative forms to trace the communication of experiences of diminished visual acuity, visual impairment, eventual loss of sight, and blindness. The four media texts under investigation explore changes in vision and present this starkly (and

Open access

Introduction

Skilled mediations

Cristina Grasseni and Thorsten Gieser

In this special section, we conceptualise ‘Skilled mediations’ to examine the following questions from several ethnographic perspectives: How do skills and media interact, enable and limit our engagement in our material and social environments? How can this be studied ethnographically? We take our previous works on ‘skilled visions’ and ‘enskilment’ as starting points to define skilled mediation as a mode of engagement with the senses, practice, skill and media.

Open access

Visions of prosperity and conspiracy in Timor-Leste

Judith Bovensiepen

the status quo, thus advancing “a vision of a new society and a new life” (Duarte 1987–1988: 51). The priest was not the only one who speculated about the existence of “cargo cults” in East Timor. When in 2011 the East Timorese government (by then

Open access

Committee as Witness

Ethics Review as a Technology of Collective Attestation

Rachel Douglas-Jones

distant, professionalized viewer, one for whom an idea of objectivity hovers. However, as I go on to show, there are important and interesting departures. My argument proceeds in four parts. I am interested first in how the collective vision of the

Restricted access

Imperial Vision

Anti-Colonial Revisions

Patrick Williams

The production of models, narratives or ‘visions’ of the 1930s, as with any other periodising, involves processes of selection and rejection, inclusion and exclusion. It is a matter of no small interest that one of the most significant areas of exclusion from such paradigms has been the Empire. This article points to, but hardly constitutes a rectification of, that situation. Rather than any attempt at ‘the big picture’, in its allotted space it offers more in the way of a thumbnail sketch, but one which aims at something like a symptomatic relevance in its juxtaposition of two areas of textual production to give a sense of the ideological and political struggles taking place via the various envisionings and revisionings of imperialism in this period.

Restricted access

Colonial Visions

Egyptian Antiquities and Contested Histories in the Cairo Museum

Christina Riggs

During the Egyptian revolution in January 2011, the antiquities museum in Tahrir Square became the focus of press attention amid claims of looting and theft, leading Western organizations and media outlets to call for the protection of Egypt’s ‘global cultural heritage’. What passed without remark, however, was the colonial history of the Cairo museum and its collections, which has shaped their postcolonial trajectory. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Cairo museum was a pivotal site for demonstrating control of Egypt on the world stage through its antiquities. More than a century later, these colonial visions of ancient Egypt, and its place in museums, continue to exert their legacy, not only in the challenges faced by the Egyptian Antiquities Museum at a crucial stage of redevelopment, but also in terms of museological practice in the West.

Restricted access

Competing Visions

The Visual Culture of the Congo Free State and Fin de Siècle Europe

Matthew G. Stanard

” was epitomized in images that placed the explorer himself in a heroic, apical role, surveying the land and encountering, perhaps leading, anonymous groups of Africans. 13 This was also a gendered vision: the continent south of the Sahara became an

Restricted access

Strange Contracts: Elfriede Jelinek and Michael Haneke

Vicky Lebeau

This article explores the representation of sexuality and vision in Elfriede Jelinek's Die Klavierspielerin [The Piano Teacher] (1983) and Michael Haneke's La Pianiste (2001). In its focus on the relation between Mother and Erika, Die Klavierspielerin brings right to the fore the grounding of both sexuality and visuality in the ongoing ties between mother and child. Displacing that novel onto the screen, Haneke redoubles its focus on vision. It is in the convergence between the two that we can begin to explore what may be described as the maternal dimension of the various technologies of vision that have come to pervade the everyday experience of looking—their effect on our ways of understanding the relations between visuality and selfhood, visuality and mind.

Restricted access

Doubting Vision: Film and the Revelationist Tradition

Kevin W. Sweeney

Book Review of Malcolm Turvey, Doubting Vision: Film and the Revelationist Tradition

Restricted access

Disciplining Vision in Animal Biotechnology

Cristina Grasseni

In this article, skilled vision is presented as a capacity acquired in a community of practice that enables specific ways of knowing and acting in the world. The analysis of skilled vision is obtained through the ethnographic study of the artefacts and the routines that structure certain ecologies of practice. The example chosen is that of the skilled gaze of animal breeders, in particular of the children of dairy cow breeders who, by playing with relevant toys and emulating the adult world of cattle fairs and exhibitions, learn how to value certain criteria of animal beauty and to "discipline" their vision accordingly.