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Eluding the Esculacho

A Masculinities Perspective on the Enduring Warrior Ethos of Rio de Janeiro's Police

Celina Myrann Sørbøe

and Zaluar 2017 ; Lopes et al. 2016 ). I apply a masculinities perspective to the ways in which policing activities are framed and enacted as I examine the social processes that endorse and reproduce a militaristic warrior ethos. I foreground one

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Elizabeth C. Macknight

Gender and class informed the attitudes of French noblemen toward military training and an army career in the France of the early Third Republic. Honor for the male aristocracy was considered to be “in the blood” and still very closely bound to ancient military virtues of duty, bravery, and sacrifice. Boys raised in noble families were conditioned to value martial honor—and to seek to embody it—well before entering prestigious military academies in adolescence. Ancestral tradition created pressure on noblemen to serve with distinction in the army and, by doing so, to conform to an ideal of military manhood. This strained some noblemen's relationships with male relatives and the cross-generational imperative to uphold the warrior ethos led many to their death on the battlefield.

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Introduction

Exceptionalism and Necropolitical Security Dynamics in Olympic Rio de Janeiro

Margit Ystanes and Tomas Salem

Sørbøe in this section traces the hypermasculine formation of the warrior ethos not to the situation of intergroup violence in the favelas (cf. Gripp and Zaluar 2017 ; Zaluar 2010 ) but to the subjective production of anti-communist guerilla warriors in

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The Permeable Olympic Fortress

Mega-Event Security as Camouflage in Rio de Janeiro

Dennis Pauschinger

. 2020 . “ Eluding the Esculacho: A Masculinities Perspective on the Enduring Warrior Ethos of the Rio de Janeiro Police .” Conflict & Society 6 ( 2020 ). 10.3167/arcs.2020.060105 Terre des Hommes . 2016 . “ Breaking Records: Child Rights