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A gendered ethnography of elites

Women, inequality, and social reproduction

Luna Glucksberg

wealth transfers and elite reproduction Wealth advisers estimate that the biggest wealth transfer event in recorded history will take place between 2007 and 2061. It will consist of $59 trillion being transferred and divided among heirs, charities, and

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Introduction

Ethnographic engagements with global elites

Paul Robert Gilbert and Jessica Sklair

Abstract

Anthropological interest in critical studies of class, system, and inequality has recently been revitalized. Most ethnographers have done this from “below,” while studies of financial, political, and other professional elites have tended to avoid the language of class, capital, and inequality. This themed section draws together ethnographies of family wealth transfers, philanthropy, and private sector development to reflect on the place of critique in the anthropology of elites. While disciplinary norms and ethics usually promote deferral to our research participants, the uncritical translation of these norms “upward” to studies of elites raises concerns. We argue for a critical approach that does not seek political purity or attempt to “get the goods” on elites, but that makes explicit the politics involved in doing ethnography with elites.

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Anti-social security

The changing contours of the hegemonic field in the twenty-first-century United States

Jeff Maskovsky

crisis into the economy, requiring state-coordinated upward wealth transfer repeatedly since the 1970s. The 2007-2008 housing market meltdown is certainly the most exaggerated moment to date in this prolonged crisis—and the most blatant bank rescue—but it

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Reclaiming the streets

Black urban insurgency and antisocial security in twenty-first-century Philadelphia

Jeff Maskovsky

wealth transfer repeatedly since the 1970s. The 2008 housing market meltdown is certainly the most exaggerated moment to date in this prolonged crisis—and the most blatant bank rescue—but it follows on the heels of the collapse in the 1990s of the

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Richard H. Robbins

the extent of this wealth transfer. Table 1 illustrates the distribution of wealth-generating assets by wealth percentile. As one would expect, the top 1 percent has a significantly higher percentage of interest-bearing assets (50.4 percent) and a