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Resources of Hope

Wicken Fen Stories of Anthropogenic Nature

Laura Cameron

Through a series of stories about the U.K. National Trust nature reserve known as Wicken Fen, this article seeks to contextualize the coining of the word 'anthropogenic' and to highlight some possible 'resources for a journey of hope' (to use the words of Raymond Williams). Although o en portrayed as 'wilderness' and the last wetland remnant of the drained Great Fenland, Wicken Fen is also acknowledged to be one of the most intensively managed reserves in the U.K. This article is therefore an exploration of human-made nature which seeks to understand what it might mean - and has meant - to live in the Anthropocene.

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Brendon M. H. Larson

Introduction Traditionally, conservation has focused on areas that are relatively free of human influence, in particular large wilderness areas. However, with increasing recognition of human effects on the planet, the adequacy of this approach is

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Sabine Hofmeister

This article is based on the thesis that wilderness as a cultural value emerges where it has been lost as a geographical and material phenomenon. In Europe the idea of wilderness experienced a surprising upswing at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century, with wilderness tours, wilderness education, and self-experience trips into “wilderness” becoming widely established. Also, protection of “wilderness areas” which refers to such different phenomena as large forests, wild gardens, and urban wild is very much in demand. Against this background, the article looks into the material-ecological and symbolic-cultural senses of “wilderness” in the context of changing social relations to nature. Three forms of wilderness are distinguished. Adopting a socio-ecological perspective, the article builds on contemporary risk discourse.

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Civilization as the Undesired World

Radical Environmentalism and the Uses of Dystopia in Times of Climate Crisis

Stine Krøijer

-primitivist communities in the US engage in dissemination of ‘primitive living skills’ through gatherings and movement rendezvous. In this context, skill sharing involves learning the ability to immerse oneself, connect to, and live in wilderness, for example, by

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Dieter Rink

Since about the 1980s shrinkage has become a new normality especially for European cities and urban regions. As a consequence of the shrinking process, new dimensions of wastelands appear in the affected cities. Urban planners have to find solutions for these “holes” in the urban fabric and new visions are needed for open spaces. In the last few years, the wilderness concept has emerged in the planning field and it has become a fashionable term, in particular in urban restructuring in eastern Germany. If wilderness is a usable concept for urban restructuring, can wilderness be a new structuring element for urban planning? This article analyzes the mechanisms of formation of wasteland in shrinking cities, and then focuses on related debates in urban planning as well as the debates in urban ecology and nature conservation research. The article concludes by considering different aspects of these debates and the question of which role wilderness can play in shrinking cities is discussed.

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Rebecca Hardin

Relationships emerging between corporate actors and environmental conservation organizations range from partnerships in field operations to gifts brokered at the upper echelons of corporate and nongovernmental organization (NGO) management. Drawing on Mauss’s original formulation of “the gift,” I consider the social consequences and contexts of these relationships, over various territorial and temporal scales. I argue that recent critiques of conservation NGOs for having “sold out” to corporate interests obscure a more nuanced view of such relationships, their roots in the history of wildlife conservation under colonial circumstances, and their connections to new modes of hybrid environmental governance. These latter include transformations in corporate practice vis-à-vis consumer preference, processes of certification, and educational impacts on professional training for industry personnel, as well as the adoption by many NGOs of terminologies and planning processes from the corporate world. These relational norms and institutional transformations make any oversimplified notion of corporate responsibility insufficient with respect to environmental sectors.

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Contact with Nature as Essential to the Human Experience

Reflections on Pandemic Confinement

Alan E. Kazdin and Pablo Vidal-González

Human contact with nature is more important than ever before considering the global confinement brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the increased urbanization of society, and increased rates of mental disorders and threats to human well-being. This article conveys the importance of contact with nature from three perspectives: historical, sociocultural, and scientific. These perspectives convey the many ways in which contact with nature is essential to human life, the multiple ways in which this is expressed, and the broad range of benefits this has. The case for preserving the natural environment continues to be made in light of the dangers of climate change, the deleterious effects of pollution, and the importance of habitats. We add to the case by underscoring how human well-being has depended on contact with natural environments and how the need for this contact is more salient now than ever before.

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Arsen’ev’s Lament

A Century of Change to Wildlife and Wild Places in Primorye, Russia

Jonathan C. Slaght

When Vladimir Arsen'ev first arrived in the Russian province of Primorye in 1900, known then as part of the Ussuri Kray, he was smitten by the mosaic of wilderness and culture he found there. This was a land of tigers and bears, Chinese and Udege

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Anan D’Sageinan B’Shleimuta

A Theology of LGBTQ Integrity, Integration and Rabbinic Leadership

Shulamit Ambalu

Abstract

This article is a conversation between text and life. The particular integrity of lesbian and gay rabbinic leadership is shown to be rooted in the character of Job, in an architectural detail of the wilderness Tabernacle, and in the urgency and the aspiration of Rava, a sage of the Babylonian Talmud. This very quality of integrity and straightness is shown to be called out for, and towards, at this point in history, and is strongly exemplified in the lives of Rabbi Sheila Shulman and rabbinic student Andreas Hinz, z’l.

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Russia's Frozen Frontier: A History of Siberia and the Russian Far East, 1581–1991: Alan Wood Ryan Tucker Jones

The Raven's Gift: A Scientist, a Shaman, and Their Remarkable Journey through the Siberian Wilderness: Jon Turk; On the Run in Siberia: Rane Willerslev Alexander D. King

Frontier Encounters: Knowledge and Practice at the Russian, Chinese and Mongolian Border: Frank Billé, Grégory Delaplace, and Caroline Humphrey Laura Siragusa

Indigenous People and Demography: The Complex Relation between Identity and Statistics: Per Axelsson and Peter Sköld, eds. Anna Bara

Aboriginal Health in Canada: Historical, Cultural and Epidemiological Perspectives, 2nd edition: James D. Waldram, D. Ann Herring, and T. Kue Young Zoe Todd

Books Received for Review