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Chiara Bonfiglioli

Women's Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War , Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2019, 306 pp. $25.35 (paperback), ISBN: 978-1-47800-181-2. Women's and feminist activism in the Cold War era, and particularly transnational encounters

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Chiara Bonfiglioli

The Cold War era has been mainly represented as a period of gender conservatism in feminist literature, and communist women in Eastern and Western Europe have been often described as manipulated or deprived of agency due to their lack of autonomy from Communist Party politics. On the basis of archival sources and autobiographies, this article explores the Cold War activities of a women's organization founded in Yugoslavia during the Second World War: the Antifašistički Front Žena (Antifascist Women's Front, or AFŽ). The article describes the activities of the AFŽ from its creation until its dissolution in 1953, focusing on its campaigns for women's political, economic, and social rights in the postwar and early Cold War period. By engaging with the pioneering work of Zagreb feminist historian Lydia Sklevicky and with new archival sources, the article aims to shed light on women's political and social agency in Cold War times.

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The East Side Story of Gender and Feminism

The Hungarian and Czech Cases

Gabriela Dudeková Kováčová

Judith Szapor, Hungarian Women's Activism in the Wake of the First World War: From Rights to Revanche , New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 207 pp. 102.60 USD (hardback), ISBN 978-1-350-02049-8. Iveta Jusová and Jiřina Šiklová, eds

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Exploring Continuities and Reconciling Ruptures

Nationalism, Feminism, and the Ukrainian Women's Movement

Martha Kichorowska Kebalo

Aspects of the women's movement evolving in post-Soviet Ukraine may be viewed as an extension of a transnational Ukrainian women's movement that had its origins in the nineteenth-century Russian and Austro-Hungarian empires. This essay traces the continuities of personnel and mission that serve to link disparate historical phases of such a movement over temporal and geographic discontinuities, even over homeland and diaspora communities. A central question is how the political history of Ukraine, and in particular, its lack of a unified state for most of the twentieth century, has affected the history of the country's women's movement. Historically, the feminism of Ukrainian women, often clearly evident in their pronouncements and strategies, has been obscured by the political context of their movement, which has encouraged its framing as nationalist, even by the women themselves. It is suggested that a growing body of historical scholarship is promoting a broader understanding of Ukrainian women's activism. Such projects can serve to bridge ruptures in the 'national ethos' that stem from Ukraine's complex history, reclaim the feminism of the movement, and focus the range of women's activism in Ukraine on a consensual, specifically women's, agenda.

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Mona Tajali

Male leaders have often used women's bodies and dress as a means to regulate their access to formal politics, including to national parliaments. Through an analysis of women's activism surrounding the expansion of headscarved women's access to the parliament during the 2011 parliamentary elections in Turkey, I argue that pious women's public protests against discriminatory actions of male leaders towards headscarved women's candidacy challenged the hegemonic symbolism surrounding the headscarf as articulated by both secularist and conservative religious forces. The consequent discourse shift offered a new perspective on women's sexuality in the public arena and brought secular and pious women's rights groups, who rarely saw eye to eye with one another, closer as they realised that imposed dress codes are vehicles for their exclusion from formal politics.

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Ioana Cîrstocea

feminist movements. Its small size, its loosely structured activities, and its geographic scope might account for the omission of the network from the wide literature centered on women's activism “beyond borders” 5 published over the last decades. Ignoring

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“The 1990s Wasn't Just a Time of Bandits; We Feminists Were Also Making Mischief!”

Celebrating Twenty Years of Feminist Enlightenment Projects in Tver’

Julie Hemment and Valentina Uspenskaya

, your former students, took on leadership roles to try themselves out as teachers and undertake organizational work. Valentina: That's right. The evening school was a second step of women's activism, like the crisis center. It was our answer to the

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Valentina Mitkova

feminisms, and the production of knowledge during the second half of the twentieth century) by Krassimira Daskalova, which looks at the complex and contested theme of women's activism in Eastern Europe during the Cold War period; “Seksut i vlastta: Pogled

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Virile Resistance and Servile Collaboration

Interrupting the Gendered Representation of Betrayal in Resistance Movements

Maša Mrovlje

III) . London : Seagull Books , 41 – 64 . Schwartz , P. 1987 . ‘ Redefining Resistance: Women's Activism in Wartime France ’, in M. R. Higonnet , J. Jenson , S. Michel , and M. C. Weitz (eds), Behind the Lines: Gender and the

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Between Trauma and Resilience

A Transnational Reading of Women's Life Writing about Wartime Rape in Germany and Bosnia and Herzegovina

Agatha Schwartz and Tatjana Takševa

Press, 1994), 82–169, here 137; Elissa Helms, Innocence and Victimhood: Gender, Nation and Women's Activism in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2013), 54. 29 On Vilina Vlas, see Mythili Rajiva and Agatha Schwartz