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Lalita Pandit

This article examines how three classic Hindi films—Pyasaa, The Guide, and Jagate Raho—draw on Indic paradigms of devotional love and śānta rasa and how they use “wonder” as a resolution to distressing emotions experienced by the characters and elicited in the viewer. To this effect, the article emphasizes how socio-cultural models of appraisal elicit various kinds of emotion, and, from this culturally situated but broadly universalist perspective, it traces the journey of the protagonists from fear, dejection, and despair toward amazement and peace. Among contemporary cognitive theories of emotion, the article uses perspectives drawn from the appraisal theory.

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A Ritual Demystified

The Work of Anti-wonder among Sufi Reformists and Traditionalists in a Macedonian Roma Neighborhood

Galina Oustinova-Stjepanovic

of participants’ spiritual virtue and ritual competences, and a production floor of wonder. For the reformists, the ritual was a target for iconoclasm and ‘anti-wonder’ ( Tomlinson 2017 ), something that had to be demystified and exposed as nothing

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Abin Chakraborty

realities in pejorative terms. This, in turn, created a discursive need for “civilisation” and “rescue” ( Singh 1996, 6 ) that subsequent direct colonial interventions sought to supposedly achieve. No wonder an Englishman could irritably exclaim in 1675

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Circling around the really Real in Iran

Ethnography of Muharram laments among Shi'i volunteer militants in the Middle East

Younes Saramifar

grace. In speaking with them, I sensed what Birgit Meyer—inspired by Hans Kippenberg—calls “wow effects and a sense of wonder … in the conjuring of ‘sacred surplus’” ( 2015: 8 ). However, the young Shia men whom I encountered did not treat the sacred

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Jennifer Dodge, Richard Holtzman, Merlijn van Hulst, and Dvora Yanow

we work? We also wonder at the parallels between an ‘interpretive classroom’ and teaching informed by feminist theory: might the same question be posed concerning the relationship between feminist research methods and feminist pedagogy? Additionally

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Joseph Cox

I wonder what my son saw. Two tours in Iraq, the loss of two best friends, in two violent provinces, end punctuated by two months in peaceful Kurdistan, time to reflect in relative safety.

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We are writing this note in late July, during a temporary cease-fire in this summer’s Gaza War, and wondering how and when this particular subwar will end. We dare not even think about long-range peace solution in the current circumstances.

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Mariske Westendorp, Bruno Reinhardt, Reinaldo L. Román, Jon Bialecki, Alexander Agadjanian, Karen Lauterbach, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Kate Yanina DeConinck, Jack Hunter, Ioannis Kyriakakis, Magdalena Crăciun, Roger Canals, Cristina Rocha, Khyati Tripathi, Dafne Accoroni, and George Wu Bayuga

Reconstruction. This may leave some readers wondering how to gauge the impact of Spiritualism in New Orleans. Clark demonstrates that a séance was neither a shelter from nor a substitute for political mobilization: ‘spiritual work’ was a form of political action

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From Imagination to Inquiry

The Discourse of “Discovery” in Early English Writings on India

Pramod K. Nayar

This article unravels a discourse of discovery in early English writings on India, suggesting that this discourse works through three stages. The first stage constructs a fantasy of discovery about India even before the Englishman's arrival in the country. This demanded a representation of Indian wonders and the wondrous geographical-physical expansion of England into the distant reaches of the known world. In the second stage a narrative organization of the "discoveries" of Indian wealth and variety was achieved through the deployment of three dominant rhetorical modes—visuality, wonder, and danger. In the final stage the Englishman meticulously documented but also sought to explain the discoveries in the narrative form of the "inquiry." The "inquiry" shifted the discourse from that of India as a wondrous space to India as knowable and therefore manageable one. The sense of wonder modulates into a more organized negotiation, as a quest for specific information and as means of providing this information.

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Editorial

Imperial crisis and the millennium goals

Monique Nuijten

Poverty is ‘big business’. Donor funds are set to increase substantially as the UN millennium targets—to eradicate extreme poverty and halve the number of people suffering from hunger by 2015—seem ever more out of reach. Small wonder that social science methods to assess levels of poverty and the results of development projects have become a hot issue, too. As much of the research on poverty directly feeds into policy making and donor strategies, people are rightly concerned about its quality. Anthropology has a stake in this debate: despite the hegemony of quantitative methods in development research, participatory rural appraisals and poverty assessments have always drawn upon anthropological methods. One might wonder what happens to these qualitative methods in research that aims to establish quantitative levels of poverty.