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Eschatology, Ethics, and Ēthnos

Ressentiment and Christian Nationalism in the Anthropology of Christianity

Jon Bialecki

This is an article about eschatology, ressentiment , and Christian nationalism. It is also about the unfixed nature of the nationalist imagination, the mutability of the ethical form, and the consequences of the various masks that ethics takes. My

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Iver B. Neumann

, spiritual nationalism saw Europe as a different yet approachable and overlapping Christian culture, a Christian culture with which Russia could have various relations. Second, xenophobic nationalism was able to even out differences between rightist and

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Andre Gingrich, Brigitte Vettori, Elisabeth Schober and Luisa Setur

Christian Giordano and Andrea Boscoboinik (eds.), Constructing risk, threat, catastrophe: Anthropological perspectives

Andre Gingrich and Marcus Banks (eds.), Neo-nationalism in Europe and beyond: Perspectives from anthropology and Andre Gingrich and Richard G. Fox (eds.), Anthropology, by comparison

Sheba Mariam George, When women come first: Gender and class in transnational

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Kacper Pobłocki

This article describes why the Polish government has pushed for an invocation to Christian traditions in the European Union Constitution. It is argued that this is a rather 'unfortunate' outcome of the political alliance between the Catholic Church and the Polish left, especially between President Aleksander Kwaśniewski and the Democratic Left Alliance (SLD). This alliance allowed the SLD to legitimize their rule in the post-socialist Poland, and it was a result of a political competition between them and the post-Solidarność elites. As a result, John Paul II became the central integrative metaphor for the Polish society at large, which brought back in the marginalized as well as allowed the transition establishment to win the EU accession referendum in 2003. The article (which was written when Leszek Miller was still Prime Minister) demonstrates how this alliance crystallized and presents various elements of the cult of the Pope in Poland that followed. Finally, it argues that the worship of the Pope is not an example of nationalism, but of populism, understood not as a peripheral but as a central political force, and advocates for more research on the 'politics of emotions' at work in the centers and not in peripheries.

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Analyzing African Formations

Multi-national Corporations, Non-capitalist Relations, and 'Mothers of the Community'

Caroline Ifeka

The West gazes hard at the continent it is has exploited for so long. Reflecting Western discourses of Africa as that ‘dark other’, texts use epithets immersed in preconceptions of Africa’s inequality: differences of race and religion, with Western ‘civilization’ standing for, and justifying, unequal power relations of apparent antiquity. Nineteenth-century Royal Geographical Society audiences, enthusiastic supporters of Britain’s growing empire and overseas Christian missions, learned from distinguished travelers about ‘the slave trade’, ‘ju-ju’, ‘paganism and devil worship’, ‘Mecca’, ‘the import-export trade’, ‘white traders’, and ‘black middlemen’. Favorite twentieth-century discourses included ‘black nationalism’, ‘weak states’ and ‘African indebtedness’, ‘corrupt government’, ‘ruthless multi-national oil companies’, ‘environmental pollution’, and ‘poverty’. Twenty-first-century researchers write of ‘endemic violence’ coalescing around inter-state international borders or intra-state ethnic boundaries; ethnic militants fight for ‘ethnic sovereignties’, jostling to wrest from the nation-state customary rights of ownership and control over ‘our god-given’ oil, clashing with giant multi-national corporations that lease from nation-state governments—not oil-producing communities claiming customary ownership—vast blocks of swamp, desert, and sea under which lies ‘black gold’ (Ifeka 2000: 452; cf. Hertz 2001: 194ff.).

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Introduction

Religions, Histories, and Comparisons

Simon Coleman, Ruy Llera Blanes and Sondra L. Hausner

present, and the complex workings of temporality in the making and remaking of culture. More subtly, Bialecki’s depiction of the “underdetermined structure” of Christian nationalism in the United States contains a theory of variation and change

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Afterword

So What Is the Anthropology of Buddhism About?

David N. Gellner

deeply implicated in the rise of Sinhalese and other nationalisms. Buddhist nationalism could exist, to some extent, just as it could in Christian countries, even before the advent of colonialism and modern ideas of the nation-state. That, at any rate, is

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A Clash of Civilizations?

Pegida and the Rise of Cultural Nationalism

David N. Coury

Frank Walter recount in their overview of the history of Pegida, the founders of the group wished to concentrate their resistance on migrants and immigrants and rejected any solidarity with ethnic groups, choosing instead to focus on German nationalism

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Anthony Egan

Secular Meaning of the Gospel . Harmondsworth : Penguin . Walshe , P. 1977 . ‘ Church versus State in South Africa: The Christian Institute and the Resurgence of African Nationalism ’, Journal of Church and State 19 ( 3 ): 457 – 479 . Walshe , P

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Demos and Nation

Misplacing the Dilemmas of the European Union--In Memory of Stanley Hoffmann

Charles S. Maier

were to allow the limited practice of the alternative Christian faiths). Nations, in contrast, were communities (not only imagined) of belonging, resting on diverse and variable criteria: sometimes a common language, a belief in common ancestry