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Beverly Weber

The perceived crisis triggered by the current refugee influx highlights the contradiction at the heart of human rights discourse. Modern humanity has been constructed as both European and as universal; the racialized “Other” against whom the “modern human” disturbs this construction by laying claim to human rights from the very heart of Europe. The sexualized violence reported in Cologne on New Year’s Eve fed into racialized fears of refugees and immigrants promoted by groups on the radical right, even as racialized fears returned to mainstream discourses. Critical responses to the racism of the radical right unfortunately also participate in racialized discourses by resorting to “Europe” or “European values.” This analysis suggests the need to consider Europe as a field of power, one in which the contestation over what Europe is or should be results in concrete, racialized disparities in access to social mobility, education, or public agency. A project for racial, gender and economic justice requires the thinking of Europe as an ongoing project of world-making. The call to revisit or reclaim “European” values cannot succeed here. Nor can a response to the new right (or the newly normalized racism of the center) allow the new right to determine the parameters of debates about possibilities for the future.

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Henning Best

This article aims to empirically test the so called low-cost hypothesis. The hypothesis posits that cost moderates the strength of the relationship between environmental concern and behavior. The effects of the behavioral cost and environmental concern on household waste recycling were evaluated, using empirical data collected from 2,695 respondents in Cologne, Germany. Empirically, a clear effect of both behavioral cost and environmental concern can be identified. Recycling rates are higher when a curbside scheme is implemented or the distance to collection containers is low. In addition, the probability of recycling participation rises when the actor has a pronounced environmental concern. This effect of environmental attitudes does not vary with behavioral cost and opportunities. Therefore, the low-cost hypothesis is not supported by the study.

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Julia Hell

Sascha Anderson, Sascha Anderson (Cologne, 2002)

Jörg Magenau, Christa Wolf. Eine Biographie (Berlin, 2002)

Christa Wolf, Leibhaftig. Erzahlung (Munich, 2002)

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Dorothee Schaper

First, I want to say thank you for the invitation to speak here to you on the

‘holy mountain’ from a Protestant perspective.

With me, you get a reverend from the Protestant church in Rhineland. I live

with my bicultural family in Cologne and I work for the section on theology,

ecumenics and interreligious dialogue at the Melanchthon Academy, the

place for Protestant adult education in Cologne. For a long time it has been

a place for Christian-Jewish and Christian-Muslim dialogue, and sometimes

we succeed to talk as all three together. For example at the evangelischen

Kirchentag in Cologne we organised an Abraham center and we signed the

Cologne Peace Declaration, signed by representatives from synagogues,

mosques and the churches.

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It was horrible, but we live now

The experience of young German adults in everyday encounters with the Holocaust

Lisa J. Krieg

Based on an ethnographic field study in a museum and an evening high school in Cologne, this paper discusses experiences of young German adults in everyday encounters with the Holocaust, which are oft en accompanied by feelings of discomfort. Considering the Holocaust as an uncanny, strange matter contributes to understanding that distance and proximity are key factors in creating uncomfortable encounters. Distance from the Holocaust reduces discomfort, but where distance cannot be created, other strategies have to be put to work. This article underlines the significance of experience in an individual’s personal relation to the past for gaining an improved understanding of Holocaust memorial culture in Germany.

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“Who Wants to Be Sad Over and Over Again?”

Emotion Ideologies in Contemporary German Education about the Holocaust

Lisa Jenny Krieg

Based on an ethnographic field study in Cologne, this article discusses the connection between memory practices and emotion ideologies in Holocaust education, using Sara Ahmed’s concept of affective economies. Moral goals, political demands, and educators’ care for their students lead to tensions in the education process. Two case studies illustrate how educators and learners express different, often contradictory concepts of emotion. In these studies, emotions are selectively opposed to rationality. In some contexts, emotions are considered inferior to facts and obstacles to the learning process; in others, they are superior to facts because they can communicate moral messages reliably.

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Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp, Ciraj Rassool, Bruce Levy, Vera Mey, Jeanette Atkinson, Elizabeth Rankin, Ying Ying Lai, Linda Young, Christian Mesia Montenegro and Conal McCarthy

Fetish Modernity (Museum of Ethnography, Stockholm)

Remaking an Ethnographic Museum in Cologne (The New Rautenstrauch-Joest Museum—Cultures of the World)

The George W. Bush Presidential Center (Dallas, Texas)

Moving on Asia: Towards a New Art Network 2004–2013 (Gallery LOOP, Seoul, and City Gallery Wellington)

L'Art Nouveau: La Révolution Décorative and Tamara de Lempicka (La Reine de l'Art Déco, Pinacothèque de Paris)

Staatliches Museum Ägyptischer Kunst, Glyptothek, and Alte Pinakothek, Munich

Tangible Splendor: The Chi Chang Yuan Collection of Lacquer with Mother-of-Pearl Inlay (National Museum of History, Taipei)

First Peoples (Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre, Melbourne Museum Linda Young)

The National Museum of Archaeology, Anthropology and History, and the National Museum of Peruvian Culture, Lima

David Bowie Is (Victoria and Albert Museum, London, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, and Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin)

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Catherine Plum, Klaus Berghahn, Gregory Smulewicz-Zucker, David Freis, Matthew Eckel and Malte Pehl

Mike Dennis and Norman LaPorte, State and Minorities in Communist East Germany (Berghahn: New York, 2013) Reviewed by Catherine Plum

Florian Illies, 1913. Der Sommer des Jahrhunderts (Fischer: Frankfurt/Main, 2012) Reviewed by Klaus Berghahn

Howard Eiland and Michael W. Jennings, Walter Benjamin: A Critical Life (Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2014) Reviewed by Gregory Smulewicz-Zucker

Helmut Schmitz and Annette Seidel-Arpacı, ed., Narratives of Trauma: Discourses of German Wartime Suffering in National and International Perspective (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2011) Reviewed by David Freis

Triadafilos Triadafilopoulos, Becoming Multicultural: Immigration and the Politics of Membership in Canada and Germany (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2012) Reviewed by Matthew Eckel

Frank Trommler. Kulturmacht ohne Kompass – Deutsche auswärtige Kulturbeziehungen im 20. Jahrhundert (Cologne: Böhlau Verlag, 2014). Reviewed by Malte Pehl

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Jeffrey Luppes, Klaus Berghahn, Meredith Heiser-Duron, Sara Jones and Marcus Colla

Yulia Komska, The Icon Curtain: The Cold War’s Quiet Border (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2015). Reviewed by Jeffrey Luppes, World Language Studies, Indiana University South Bend

Robert C. Holub, Nietzsche’s Jewish Problem: Between Anti-Semitism and Anti-Judaism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016). Reviewed by Klaus Berghahn, German, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Stephen F. Szabo, Germany, Russia, and the Rise of Geo-economics (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015) Reviewed by Meredith Heiser-Duron, Political Science, Foothill College

Juan Espindola, Transitional Justice after German Reunification: Exposing Unofficial Collaborators (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015). Reviewed by Sara Jones, Modern Languages, University of Birmingham

Jost Hermand, Das Liebe Geld! Eigentumsverhältnisse in der deutschen Literatur (Cologne: Böhlau, 2015) Reviewed by Klaus L. Berghahn, German, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Simon Ward, Urban Memory and Visual Culture in Berlin: Framing the Asynchronous City, 1957-2012 (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2016). Reviewed by Marcus Colla, History, University of Cambridge

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Theo Jung, Cristian Roiban, Gregor Feindt, Alexandra Medzibrodszky, Henna-Riikka Pennanen and Anna Björk

Ernst Müller and Falko Schmieder, Begriffsgeschichte und historische Semantik: Ein kritisches Kompendium (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2016), 1,027 pp.

Jörn Leonhard and Willibald Steinmetz, eds., Semantiken von Arbeit: Diachrone und vergleichende Perspektive (Cologne: Böhlau Verlag, 2016), 413 pp.

Balázs Trencsényi, Maciej Janowski, Mónika Baár, Maria Falina, and Michal Kopeček, A History of Modern Political Thought in East Central Europe, Volume I: Negotiating Modernity in the “Long Nineteenth Century” (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016), 687 pp.

Yasuhiro Matsui, ed., Obshchestvennost’ and Civic Agency in Late Imperial and Soviet Russia: Interface between State and Society (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), xi + 234 pp.

Riccardo Bavaj and Martina Steber, eds., Germany and “the West”: The History of a Modern Concept (New York: Berghahn Books, 2015), 328 pp.

Lauren Banko, The Invention of Palestinian Citizenship, 1918–1947 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016), 278 pp.