Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 101 items for :

  • HOLLYWOOD FILM x
Clear All
Full access

James E. Cutting, Kaitlin L. Brunick and Jordan E. Delong

Cinematic tradition suggests that Hollywood films, like plays, are divided into acts. Thompson (1999) streamlined the conception of this largescale film structure by suggesting that most films are composed of four acts of generally equal length—the setup, the complicating action, the development, and the climax (often including an epilog). These acts are based on the structure of the narrative, and would not necessarily have a physical manifestation in shots and transitions. Nonetheless, exploring a sample of 150 Hollywood style films from 1935 to 2005, this article demonstrates that acts shape shot lengths and transitions. Dividing films into quarters, we found that shots are longer at quarter boundaries and generally shorter near the middle of each quarter. Moreover, aside from the beginnings and ends of films, the article shows that fades, dissolves, and other non-cut transitions are more common in the third and less common in the fourth quarters of films.

Full access

James E. Cutting, Catalina Iricinschi and Kaitlin L. Brunick

This article presents a new method to create maps that chart changes across a cinematic narrative. These are unlike narrative spaces previously discussed in the literature—they are abstract, holistic, dynamic representations based on objective criteria. The analysis considers three films (All About Eve, Inception, and MASH) by counting the co-occurrences of main characters within scenes, and 12 Angry Men by counting their co-occurrences within shots. The technique used combines the statistical methods of correlation, multidimensional scaling, and Procrustes analysis. It then plots the trajectories of characters across these spaces in All About Eve and Inception, regions for characters in Inception and MASH, and compares the physical arrangement of jurors with their dramatic roles in 12 Angry Men. These maps depict the changing structures in the visual narrative. Finally, through consideration of statistical learning, the article explores the plausibility that these maps mimic relations in the minds of film viewers.

Full access

Stepping through the Silver Screen

Austro-German Filmmaker, Bestselling Author, and Journalist Colin Ross Discovers Australia

Anne Rees

that her image of the United States was based upon the “sugary adolescent concept of American life” found in the Hollywood films of her youth. Evenings spent in Melbourne’s “picture palaces” had taught her that the nation was composed of “dumb

Full access

Back in Time Yet of His Time

Marty McFly as a 1980s Teenage Boy Role Model

Daniel Smith-Rowsey

to films about teenage boys that were set and made in the 1980s, because, however incidentally, they offer role models for those of us who hope to raise slightly less overscheduled boys. (I confess to personal interest; I have two small sons.) When we

Full access

Disrupted PECMA Flows

A Cognitive Approach to the Experience of Narrative Complexity in Film

Veerle Ros and Miklós Kiss

an accurate representation of our everyday experience of reality), we need only look at the nonmimetic, “unnatural” modes in which classical film narratives represent reality. In classical Hollywood cinema, time is highly condensed, characters

Full access

Akkadia Ford

feature-length film (117 minutes) classified as a “Biography/Drama/History” on the Internet Movie Database ( IMDb 2013a ). It relies on traditional Hollywood genre conventions, fictional narrative structures, and filming styles to convey the “real” story

Full access

James E. Cutting, Kaitlin L. Brunick and Jordan DeLong

This is an amendment to the article "How Act Structure Sculpts Shot Lengths and Shot Transitions in Hollywood Film" by the same authors published in Projections 5(1), summer 2011.

Full access

Barbara Mennel

Tim Bergfelder, Erica Carter, and Deniz Göktürk, eds., The German Cinema Book (London: British Film Institute, 2002)

Lutz Koepnick, The Dark Mirror: German Cinema between Hitler and Hollywood (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002)

Full access

Elliott Logan

Adrian Martin, Mise en Scène and Film Style: From Classical Hollywood to New Media Art, Palgrave Close Readings in Film and Television (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), xviii + 235 pp., £60 (hardback).

John Gibbs, The Life of Mise-en-Scène: Visual Style and British Film Criticism, 1946–78 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013), viii + 280 pp., £65 (hardback).

Lucy Fife Donaldson, Texture in Film, Palgrave Close Readings in Film and Television (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), ix + 194 pp., £55 (hardback).

Full access

Tough Guys, Tattle-Tales, and Tears

Hollywood Defines the American Boy, 1930–1934

Peter Lee

This essay examines the portrayals of boys in American film, especially Jackie Cooper, during the “pre-code” period of Hollywood sound films, roughly 1930-1934. With the Great Depression cutting movie attendance, studios explored social taboos to entice audiences. As a result, childhood concerns, including issues of adoption, strained parental (especially father-son) relationships, or failing before one’s peers, were themes that threatened boys’ identities.