Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

SOCCER x
Clear All
Restricted access

Ingeborg Majer-O'Sickey

As host of the 2006 soccer World Cup in June and July 2006, Germany was suddenly full of different Germans, waving millions of black-red-gold mini flags and wearing their (and others') national colors with abandon. Was this show of nationalism a new kind of trans/national patriotism? Most certainly, the national enthusiasm exhibited in Germany had nothing whatsoever to do with past demonstrations of patriotism. With the focus on the country as host to world soccer aficionados, the world also learned of a multicultural Germany that has existed for the last fifty years or so. It learned that it is not always successful with its social and economic problems, and that the desire for national unity is sometimes difficult to fulfill. Quite correctly, the national media described Germany as joyous, generous, and open-minded hosts. In the foreign press, too, the old stereotypes were broken down.

Restricted access

Alessandro Baroncelli

The sporting news1 that received the most media attention in the summer

of 2006 was not the Italian victory at the World Cup but rather the

Calciopoli scandal2 that shook the world of calcio (soccer). A distinctive

characteristic of the scandal was that it involved principally the

major clubs, in particular, Juventus, the richest and most successful

club in Italian soccer. Although not the first crisis in its history, it was

undoubtedly treated as one of the most serious catastrophes ever

recorded in Italian soccer, portending the end of the credibility and

sustainability of a model of business that, with its rules and its system

of consolidated relations among its main actors, had until then characterized

Italian professional soccer.

Restricted access

Parallel Myths, Popular Maps

The Europe of Soccer

Paul Dietschy, David Ranc and Albrecht Sonntag

Although history textbooks are highly revealing sources of what is considered worthy of being included in collective memory, they only tell half the story. The study of the non-official “parallel pantheons” of popular culture also contribute significantly to understanding patterns of perception and self-perception as well as mental representations of “Europe.” For more than a century, soccer, Europe's most widely shared social practice, has contributed to shaping perceptions of what can be encompassed under the term “Europe.” This article focuses on the “popular maps” of Europe that soccer has drawn over the last half-century and hints at the myths of cultural commonality that underpin them. It appears that while soccer represents a somewhat ambiguous metaphor for contemporary Europe, it can also supply interesting insights into the emergence of horizontal bonds between Europeans.

Restricted access

Udo Merkel

The 2002 Soccer World Cup in Japan took place during the final

phase of the national election campaign for the German Bundestag

and managed to temporarily unite Chancellor Gerhard Schröder

(SPD) and his conservative challenger, Edmund Stoiber1. Both were

keen to demonstrate repeatedly that they were so interested in the

progress of the German team that they simultaneously interrupted or

left meetings to follow televised matches. Domestically, they support

very different soccer clubs. Stoiber is on the board of directors of the

richest German club, Bayern Munich, whose past successes, wealth

and arrogance, numerous scandals, and boardroom policies of hireand-

fire have divided the German soccer nation: they either hate or

adore the team. Schröder is a keen fan and honorary member of

Borussia Dortmund, which is closely associated with the industrial

working class in the Ruhr area. It is the only team on par with

Munich; despite its wealth, the management policies of the club

appear modest and considerate; the club continuously celebrates its

proletarian traditions and emphasizes its obligations to the local

community. Stoiber’s election manifesto did not even mention sport,

whereas the SPD’s political agenda for sport focused upon a wide

variety of issues ranging from welfare, leisure, physical education,

and health to doping, television coverage, facilities, and hosting

international events.

Restricted access

From Black-Blanc-Beur to Black-Black-Black?

“L'Affaire des Quotas” and the Shattered “Image of 1998” in Twenty-First-Century France

Christopher S. Thompson

Since the mid-1990s, France's national soccer team has been given considerable significance in French debates about post-colonial immigration, national identity, republican citizenship, and the enduring legacies of French imperialism. This article explores the role played by representations of the team in those debates with a particular focus on the so-called “affaire des quotas” of 2010–2011. It argues that those representations reveal that the boundary between the purportedly inclusive civic nationalism of French republicanism according to which any person willing to embrace the duties and rights of democratic citizenship may theoretically become French, and the exclusionary ethnic nationalism of the xenophobic Front national is far less impermeable than is generally assumed in France. Indeed, race and ethnicity inform notions of French citizenship even among persons who reject the essentialist views of the Far Right.

Restricted access

Jean-François Loudcher

From 1945 to 1947, and then again from 1953 to 1977, Jean Minjoz served as mayor of Besançon and set up a “system” of government that allowed him to maintain power while insuring the development of the city. What was that system and how did it develop? By examining the sports politics of the city, this article reveals how the municipal sports commission and the city council worked out a subtle balance between amateur sports and the promotion of professional soccer. The political, professional, and athletic implications of this approach led representatives of the big clubs as well as the local councillors to support a basic minimum level of sports infrastructure, which in turn enabled the mayor to realize his own agenda for the city's social development program and to assure him the vote of his electorate. This politics of compromise can be categorized as republican elitist.

Restricted access

Inge Manka

During the course of the 2006 Soccer World Cup, Germans started to celebrate a “new patriotism.” As the construction of national identity is inseparable in Germany from the Nazi past, this occurrence can be considered an indicator of an altered relationship to this past. This article examines these changes by focusing on a nationally recognized site of remembrance, the former Nazi Party Rally Grounds in Nuremberg, where five matches of the World Cup were played. The convergence of site and event evokes contradictions and ambiguities, such as the encounter of the opposed needs of sports and remembrance at the same location. It shows what problems arise at a site of national collective memory today, when the role of the national collective is challenged by developments like European integration, migration within and to Europe, and the on-going effects of globalization.

Restricted access

Shulamit Reinharz and Mark A. Raider, eds., American Jewish Woman and the Zionist Enterprise Review by Jerry Kutnick

Jacob Lassner and S. Ilan Troen, Jews and Muslims in the Arab World: Haunted by Pasts Real and Imagined Review by Seth J. Frantzman

Rebecca L. Stein, Itineraries in Conflict: Israelis, Palestinians, and the Political Lives of Tourism Review by Hadas Weiss

Anthony H. Cordesman, Arab-Israeli Military Forces in an Era of Asymmetric Wars Review by Eyal Ben-Ari

David Rodman, Arms Transfers to Israel: The Strategic Logic Behind American Military Assistance Review by Zach Levey

Risa Domb, ed., Contemporary Israeli Women’s Writing Review by Naomi Sokoloff

Yifat Holzman-Gazit, Land Expropriation in Israel: Law, Culture and Society Review by Donna Robinson Divine

Baruch Kimmerling, Clash of Identities: Explorations in Israeli and Palestinian Societies Review by Uriel Abulof

Nili Scharf Gold, Yehuda Amichai: The Making of Israel’s National Poet Review by Lisa Katz

Jakob Feldt, The Israeli Memory Struggle: History and Identity in the Age of Globalization Review by Miriam Shenkar

Anat Helman, Or v’Yam Hekifuha: Urban Culture in 1920s and 1930s Tel Aviv Review by Moshe Gershovich

Aziza Khazzoom, Shifting Ethnic Boundaries and Inequality in Israel: Or, How the Polish Peddler Became a German Intellectual Review by Dafna Hirsch

Leonard Grob and John K. Roth, eds., Anguished Hope: Holocaust Scholars Confront the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict Review by Ruth Amir

Tamir Sorek, Arab Soccer in a Jewish State: The Integrative Enclave Review by Sarah F. Salwen

David N. Myers, Between Jew & Arab: Th e Lost Voice of Simon Rawidowicz Review by Eran Kaplan

Alexander Yakobson and Amnon Rubinstein, Israel and the Family of Nations: The Jewish Nation-State and Human Rights Review by Eran Shor

Zvi Shtauber and Yiftah S. Shapir, eds., The Middle East Strategic Balance, 2005–2006 Review by Sergio Catignani