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Alessandro Baroncelli

The sporting news1 that received the most media attention in the summer

of 2006 was not the Italian victory at the World Cup but rather the

Calciopoli scandal2 that shook the world of calcio (soccer). A distinctive

characteristic of the scandal was that it involved principally the

major clubs, in particular, Juventus, the richest and most successful

club in Italian soccer. Although not the first crisis in its history, it was

undoubtedly treated as one of the most serious catastrophes ever

recorded in Italian soccer, portending the end of the credibility and

sustainability of a model of business that, with its rules and its system

of consolidated relations among its main actors, had until then characterized

Italian professional soccer.

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Ingeborg Majer-O'Sickey

As host of the 2006 soccer World Cup in June and July 2006, Germany was suddenly full of different Germans, waving millions of black-red-gold mini flags and wearing their (and others') national colors with abandon. Was this show of nationalism a new kind of trans/national patriotism? Most certainly, the national enthusiasm exhibited in Germany had nothing whatsoever to do with past demonstrations of patriotism. With the focus on the country as host to world soccer aficionados, the world also learned of a multicultural Germany that has existed for the last fifty years or so. It learned that it is not always successful with its social and economic problems, and that the desire for national unity is sometimes difficult to fulfill. Quite correctly, the national media described Germany as joyous, generous, and open-minded hosts. In the foreign press, too, the old stereotypes were broken down.