Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • body donation x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jacob Copeman

This article explores emerging ascetic orientations toward utility and death in India. It chronicles the activities of an innovative organization that campaigns for cadaver donations for the purposes of organ retrieval and dissection by trainee doctors. This would entail dispensing with cremation, a mode of cadaver disposal newly characterized as wasteful. In order to counter 'cremation-lack', the asceticism of cadaver donation is accentuated by the organization. The group thereby reinterprets classical Hinduism according to the demands of 'medical rationality'. This produces a novel 'donation theology' and additionally serves to demonstrate the 'asceticism' by which all voluntary donors of body material are obliged to abide.

Restricted access

Godless People and Dead Bodies

Materiality and the Morality of Atheist Materialism

Jacob Copeman and Johannes Quack

Atheists are not the only people who donate their bodies, yet the practice is strikingly prevalent in a variety of atheist circles. We concentrate here on the Indian case, exploring body donation as a key instance of the material culture of atheism. Recent efforts to reinvigorate study of the material culture of religion are to be welcomed, but they should be extended to non-religion in order to address the irony that sees scholars representing materialism as an abstract doctrine and, hence, as immaterial. Body donation holds value for Indian atheists as a bridge between 'positive' and 'negative' modes of atheist thought and action. It also provides a ready-made solution for atheist activists keen to circumvent the cadaver-centered death rituals they find so redundant.

Restricted access

Jack Hunter, Annelin Eriksen, Jon Mitchell, Mattijs van de Port, Magnus Course, Nicolás Panotto, Ruth Barcan, David M. R. Orr, Girish Daswani, Piergiorgio Di Giminiani, Pirjo Kristiina Virtanen, Sofía Ugarte, Ryan J. Cook, Bettina E. Schmidt and Mylene Mizrahi

different orientation toward ‘explicit’ forms of godlessness—atheism, agnosticism, humanism, and so forth. Jacob Copeman and Johannes Quack explore the attachment of self-professed atheists and rationalists to the practice of post-mortem body donation in

Restricted access

Stacy M. K. George

. Over the course of one year (during which the Obama administration was in power), I took extensive field notes to document my observations. These included information such as the number and demographics of individuals present, seating arrangements, body

Restricted access

Jens Kreinath and Refika Sariönder

of their chest with their head slightly bent forward. In the acts of prostration, they place both hands in front of their body while touching the floor with their palms. They kiss their hands and, while bowing down, touch both hands with their

Restricted access

Assessing and Adapting Rituals That Reproduce a Collectivity

The Large-Scale Rituals of the Repkong Tantrists in Tibet

Nicolas Sihlé

strained relations with a neighboring village, which currently did not take part in sponsoring the Zhitro, although it had contributed donations to the officiants in the past. The suggestion had already been made for years that that village in question