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Non “Religious” Knowing in Pilgrimages to Sacred Sites

Greek Cypriots’ “return” Pilgrimages to the Monastery of Apostolos Andreas (Cyprus)

Evgenia Mesaritou

ignorance would obscure the ways in which pilgrimage is often embedded in everyday socio-political concerns. The Monastery of Apostolos Andreas in Occupied Cyprus My focus is the monastery of Apostolos Andreas (AA) in Cyprus. Cyprus has been de facto

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Tourism for Peace?

Reflections on a Village Tourism Project in Cyprus

Julie Scott

On 1 May 2004, the Republic of Cyprus entered the European Union, unaccompanied by the Turkish-Cypriot population in the northern third of the island. The Green Line - the militarized border marking the cessation of hostilities in 1974 - now defines the outer edge of the European Union, creating a fluid and uncertain borderland which has become the focus for ongoing attempts to construct both the new Cyprus and the new Europe. Tourism has a central and contradictory role to play in these processes. It offers an avenue for stimulating economic activity and raising income levels in the Turkish-Cypriot north, and presents an opportunity to develop complementary tourism products north and south which could widen the appeal of the island as a whole and promote collaborative ventures between Greek- and Turkish-Cypriots. On the other hand, such developments face strong resistance from sections of the population north and south, who fear they will lead either to the legitimation and tacit recognition of the Turkish-Cypriot state in the north, or to a return to relations characterized by Greek-Cypriot dominance and Turkish-Cypriot dependence. The paper reflects on the author's involvement in a village tourism development project in Cyprus in 2005-2006 in order to explore what an anthropological approach to the use of tourism for political ends can tell us about conflict, and when, and under what conditions, tourism might be a force for peace and reconciliation.

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'Eros/Thanatos a pair'

The Dialectic of Life and Death in Tony Harrison's Laureate's Block

Hans Osterwalder

The dialectic of life and death is a persistent theme in Tony Harrison’s poetry. Some of his greatest poems are dominated by this subject: ‘A Kumquat for John Keats’, ‘Cyprus and Cedar’, ‘The Lords of Life’, to name just a few. Critics have repeatedly highlighted this feature: Sandy Byrne’s pioneering book states that ‘most reviews of Harrison’s work begin by saying that it is concerned with division, or that it is dialectical’; she then goes on to state that ‘[m]any of the poems’ protagonists abound in ambiguities, inconsistencies and paradoxes’. In a much quoted interview with John Haffenden, Harrison sketches out that fundamental paradoxical division of his personality

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David G. Farley, Jill Dubisch, Miriam L. Wallace, Eroulla Demetriou, and Igor Tchoukarine

Corinne Fowler, Charles Forsdick, and Ludmilla Kostova, eds., Travel and Ethics: Theory and Practice (2014) Reviewed by David G. Farley

Antón M. Pazos, ed., Pilgrims and Pilgrimages as Peacemakers in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam (2013) Reviewed by Jill Dubisch

Kathryn Walchester, Gamle Norge and Nineteenth-Century British Women Travellers in Norway (2014) Reviewed by Miriam L. Wallace

Jim Bowman, Narratives of Cyprus: Modern Travel Writing and Cultural Encounters since Lawrence Durrell (2015) Reviewed by Eroulla Demetriou

Diane P. Koenker, Club Red: Vacation Travel in the Soviet Dream (2013) Reviewed by Igor Tchoukarine

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Amira Schiff

Official negotiations between parties in ethno-national conflicts too often result in a deadlock. In such cases, the initial consent of opposing parties to sit together at the negotiating table is considered, retrospectively, to be merely a technical and ultimately futile achievement. The numerous failures of negotiations in such conflicts highlight the importance of studying the relationship between the prenegotiation process, which initially brings the parties to the negotiating table, and the results of subsequent formal negotiations, especially in view of the basic premise of the conflict resolution field's 'process school', that is, that effective execution of prenegotiation functions is critical for successful negotiations. This article examines the prenegotiation phase in two recent cases: the dispute over Cyprus in 2004 and the 'Annapolis process' of 2007-2008.

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Jackie Feldman

memories of the Greek Cypriot sites along the way become guides to pre-war Cyprus, as they connect the names and images learned in childhood notebooks and lessons with personal experiences. Distance here is essential to creating the desire that draws the

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Introduction

Post-Conflict Dynamics in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Identities, Nationalization, and Missing Bodies

Katerina Seraïdari

the destiny and the legal status of two million people, was considered at the time as a successful solution to interstate crisis regarding minorities. The geographical and political separation of Greek and Turkish Cypriots in 1976 and, more recently

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Turkish-Israeli Relations during the Cold War

The Myth of a Long ‘Special Relationship’

Kilic Bugra Kanat

creating a Turkish-Israeli alliance collapsed as a result of changes in Turkish foreign policy following the start of the Cyprus conflict in 1974. The Arab-Israeli Conflict in the 1960s and Its Impact on Turkish-Israeli Relations Although economic and

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Introduction

Knowledge, Ignorance, and Pilgrimage

Evgenia Mesaritou, Simon Coleman, and John Eade

in the memory of the locals, who recall the failed Muslim attempts to resist the Jewish rebranding. The importance of living history and memory is also illustrated by Evgenia Mesaritou, who focuses on Greek Cypriots’ return pilgrimages to the

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A Hebrew Take on Shylock on the New York Stage

Shylock ‘47 at the Pargod Theatre (1947)

Edna Nahshon

Cyprus in a British-run internment camp for detained Jewish immigrants captured en route to Mandate Palestine. In the scenes added to the Shakespearean text, Shylock ‘47 tells the story of a group of New York Hebrew actors who are rehearsing for a