Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 862 items for :

  • international relations x
Clear All
Full access

Tobias Schulze-Cleven

. Importantly, the country’s ever-greater reliance on export-led growth is not the only mechanism through which adjustments in Germany’s labor relations fed the international economic imbalances that precipitated the Eurocrisis and now fuel conflict with the

Full access

Stephen Chan

Since its inception, the discipline of International Relations has struggled to establish the rigour of its methodological base in the academy, and it has struggled to establish whether and how it might have any moral place in the world. At the end of the millennium both struggles have reached a high point. Methodologically, the discipline has begun a trans-Atlantic separation. On the one hand there has been a U.S. emphasis on neo-realism and neo-liberalism, which in both its categorisations and its positivistic tendencies is not a considerable departure from the inter-war debate between realists and idealists. On the other hand there has been a British concern not only for a ‘historicised’ discipline, but for the intellectual history of the discipline itself. Steve Smith has written on ten self-images that International Relations has held.

Full access

Valery B. Ferim

reassesses the relevance of the pan-African discourse within the context of contemporary international relations. The article interrogates whether, given the complexities of the African continent, the elusiveness of defining who an African is and the world

Full access

Subjecting International Relations to the Law of Nature

A Neglected Aspect of the Early Modern Jurists and Edmund Burke

Camilla Boisen

In this article, I deal with the issue of how the early modern thinkers dealt, over time, with the question of 'international law' and its enforcement. To draw out Burke's underappreciated view of enforcement, it recounts the law of nations ideas by some of the main jurists of the period such as Vitoria, Gentili and Suárez. As is well known, their differentiation of the law of nations from the law of nature led to the gradual emergence of the legal principle and moral right of intervention to prevent gross violations of the natural law in the discourse of international justice. Such ideas were refined by Grotius, who largely equated international law with punishment, something Pufendorf and Vattel would later criticise. I argue that it is nevertheless Edmund Burke to whom we must look to bridge the two concerns of international law: authority and enforcement. Burke provided the conceptual scope needed to plausibly resolve the issues of enforcement by prescribing specific common law foundations, binding the legal and the moral in international law and presenting it as domestic law. This way of looking at Burke is under-recognised and provides insight into some of the same concerns we face today with enforcement in international law.

Full access

Alejandro Rascovan

The invention of railways in the nineteenth century changed the world, displacing older technologies and modifying how humans perceived space and time. Further, the implementation of the railroad coincided with the institutionalization of nation-states in Europe and the Americas. The creation of a nation consisted of three major tasks—formalizing national borders, creating institutions, and capitalizing on the international division of labor. Railways played a major role in each of these endeavors. They played a key role in aiding politicians and entrepreneurs in efforts to achieve specific economic growth and political consolidation. They also structured each country’s territory via infrastructural connection. Argentina and its neighbor countries each experienced these elements of railroad construction.

Full access

Germany and Russia Since Reunification

Continuity, Change, and the Role of Leaders

Randall Newnham

by International Relations scholars focusing on power and security, has been Russia’s change to a market economy. While Putin’s Russia is now often derided as a “kleptocracy,” where political interference and institutionalized corruption have

Full access

Teaching internationalisation?

Surveying the lack of pedagogical and theoretical diversity in American International Relations

Christopher R. Cook

of Education this discussion has only just begun in political science and international relations (IR) specifically. For Education Studies internationalising the classroom has often meant teaching students to confront and understand the diversity and

Full access

The Origins of the Stanley Hoffmann We Knew

Some Comparisons on his Vichy Years with My Family Story

Peter Gourevitch

East Asia, and Rwanda broadened the consideration of genocide. Hoffmann taught courses and wrote on morality in international relations. He encouraged and advised Samantha Power in writing the much-discussed history of genocide, A Problem from Hell

Full access

Camilla Boisen

The Limits of Ethics in International Relations: Natural Law, Natural Rights and Human Rights in Transition by David Boucher

Full access

Robert A. Denemark

Copeland, Daryl. 2009. Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations. Boulder, Colo.: Lynne Rienner Publishers.

Mittelman, James. 2010. Hyperconflict: Globalization and Insecurity. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Thompson, William R., ed. 2009. Systemic Transitions: Past, Present, and Future. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.