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Lena Steveker

In act 3, scene 1 of Richard Brome's tragicomedy The Queen and Concubine (1635–1636), 1 Eulalia, former queen of Sicily, professes her happiness: … I was not great Till now, nor could I confidently say Anything was mine own till I had

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Helene Scheck

This essay examines the memorial practices at the tenth-century Saxon community of canonesses at St. Servatius, Quedlinburg, to consider what is gained—and what lost—in the remembrance of key figures of the Ottonian dynasty. A memorial foundation established by Queen Mathilda of Saxony in honor of her husband, King Henry I, this community provides a particularly effective way to explore the relationship between memory, gender, and power in Ottonian culture, since the architecture, ritual practices, institutional rules, daily and intellectual life of the inmates, and literary works possibly produced by them function together as a complex memorializing machine. Reading this community's contributions to the constitution of dynastic memory through Michel Foucault's notion of power, the essay considers the effects of memorializing practices on women in Saxony at the time, who, I argue, never come to be fully present and therefore leave their successors, women writers to come, a legacy of loss.

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Tetiana Bulakh

In this article, I analyze Koroleva Balu, hereafter referred to in English as The Queen of the Ball, a Ukrainian makeover TV show for schoolgirls that showcases girls' competition for the title of Queen during the preparation for their high school prom. A crew of professional stylists assists the participants, creating their personal styles. My focus is on an analysis of the concepts of girls' empowerment through feminine beauty and “femme-ing the normative.” I investigate how gender is constructed by the show as a performative act and how this process corresponds to post-socialist views of beauty and femininity.

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Evdokia Prassa

This article examines the quotations of Elizabeth I’s iconic portraiture as Virgin Queen in Shekhar Kapur’s Elizabeth (1998) and Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2007), and their effect on our a posteriori conceptualization of the depicted body of the female sovereign. Using Mieke Bal’s concept of preposterous history, I argue that Kapur’s transposition of Virgin Queen iconography onto celluloid results in a “(complex) text” that “is both a material object and an effect” (1999: 14). Bal acknowledges that the complexity that lies in the material results of the artistic quotation is not necessarily subversive, as it is dependent on the quoting artist’s ideological premise. Indeed, Kapur’s intermedial quotation of Elizabethan portraiture imbues the highly complex body of the female ruler with contemporary heteronormative notions of female sexuality, thereby reducing it to an object for the male gaze.

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Elizabethan Orientalia

‘Jews’in Late Tudor England and the Ottoman Jews

Josè Alberto Rodrigues da Silva Tavim

In his 1996 book Shakespeare and the Jews , James Shapiro provides a complete portrait of the Marrano circle living in London in the time of Queen Elizabeth I, whose most prominent figure was the tragic physician Dr Rodrigo Lopez. Shapiro

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Andrew J. Ball and Aleksandr Rybin

The cover of this issue of Screen Bodies features the digital work “Crypto Queen” by restlessperson (Aleksandr Rybin), which the artist has minted as an NFT. We spoke with Rybin about the subject matter of his work, connections between digital

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John V. Nance

printed book in 1588–1589: Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy (first printed in 1592), Marlowe and Nashe's Dido, Queen of Carthage (first printed in 1594) and Ben Jonson's Every Man in His Humor (first printed in 1601). However, the fourth volume of Wiggins

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Özlem Özmen

British Jewish playwright Julia Pascal has written two adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays, The Shylock Play (2009, based on The Merchant of Venice) and The Yiddish Queen Lear (1999, based on King Lear) , in which she discusses Jewish

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The Mysterious Mr Le Queux

War Novelist, Defence Publicist and Counterspy

Roger T. Stearn

wrote a column in ‘the chief ladies’ paper’, the Queen : ‘Diner Out’ of ‘biographical gossip about authors chiefly, and … announcement of forthcoming books, which could be made interesting by personal gossip’. 31 In December 1901, Le Queux wrote to

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“Give Me Back My Son!”

Eleanor of Aquitaine, Emotion Talk, and the Gendering of Political Rhetoric

Linda E. Mitchell

God queen of the English … to show himself a father to her, a suffering mother.” 25 She claims that she initially intended to remain silent, in order not to appear “insolent and presumptuous” but that her grief—which she describes as a kind of illness