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Fatima Zahra Bessedik

At home. But the soul finds its own home if it has a home at all. —Marilynne Robinson, Home In Marilynne Robinson’s Home (2008), Jack, the principal character of the story, goes back to his dwelling place after twenty years of absence. By

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Kathryn Robinson

In imagining Indonesia’s future, its character as a country with the world’s largest Islamic population emerges as a critical issue. In the post-Suharto period, some commentators have seen the emergence of Islamist politics as a threat to newly attained freedoms. No sooner had women been freed from the constraints of ‘state ibuism’, i.e., the official policy promoting the role of wife and mother (ibu) of the New Order (see Suryakusuma 1996), which endorsed patriarchal familism as a cornerstone of authoritarian politics, than they faced a new kind of patriarchal authority in the demands for the enactment of shari’a as state law. For example, during her 2005 visit to Australia, Indonesian feminist commentator Julia Suryakusuma raised the specter of Islam as the greatest current threat to gender equity and to women as social actors in civic life, whose rights in the domestic sphere are now protected by the state. The growing influence of Middle Eastern Islam in Indonesia, evidenced by funding for organizations, translations of publications, and the increase in Islamist rhetoric, has caused alarm among many observers. This apprehension draws on the stereotype of the Middle East as the source of all that is ‘bad’ about Islam, taken as an undifferentiated whole. But this view of Islam fails to acknowledge debates within Islam and diversity in Islamic practice, not the least of which are the varieties of Islam that can be found throughout the Indonesian archipelago. These diverse practices have emerged as local communities and indigenous polities responded in distinctive and often unique ways during the long period of Islamic conversion, beginning from the thirteenth century.

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The End Is Where We Start From

Communicating the Impact of a Family Music Project to Wider Audiences

Jude Robinson

There has been increasing pressure for anthropologists to communicate their ideas and thinking to new publics and so actively engage in national and international debates relating to their field. However, this is not an unproblematic practice and the politics of representation requires anthropologists to consider the sometimes conflicting dimensions of the moral, ethical, political, social, personal and academic. My fieldwork with families linked to In Harmony Liverpool, a children's music project in England, involved inviting participants variously to take part in interviews, draw maps of musical sites in their homes, construct playlists of favourite songs and take photographs of sites in their homes where music 'happens'. As my aim is to produce a visual and audio display to communicate with wider audiences, I consider the issues of representation, authenticity, potential damage and 'othering' in the planning of the research and how this shaped data collection and the plans for dissemination.

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Amy Cox Hall, Sergio González Varela, Jessica S.R. Robinson, Peter Weisensel, and David Wills

and well-written book is simply a joy to read. After reading this text I hope, as Usher does, that “women should acknowledge their strengths as researchers and go confidently, but humbly, into the field” (66). Jessica S. R. Robinson University of

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Listening to Youth

The Experiences of Young Women in Northern Uganda

Jenny Perlman Robinson

In May 2007, the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children traveled to the Acholi districts of northern Uganda and met with more than 100 young women, aged from ten to thirty years, to gather their views, opinions and perceptions.

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Tanya Zoe Robinson

On 1–2 April 2014, the Institute of Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney, Australia (UWS), hosted Museums, Collecting, Agency: A Symposium, in partnership with the Museums and Heritage Studies Programme, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand (VUW). Held at the Australian Museum (AM) in Sydney, the event brought together an outstanding lineup of speakers from Australia, New Zealand, Portugal, the United States, and Britain to explore questions of agency in relation to ethnographic museum collections and museum-like practices of collecting, with an emphasis on the histories and legacies of colonialism. In doing so, the speakers and audience (mainly academics, museum professionals, and museum studies students from Australia and the Pacific) ably brought these issues into the present through varied histories and practice-based case studies that ensured a very “living” approach to this growing research area.

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Boys, Inclusive Masculinities and Injury

Some Research Perspectives

Adam White and Stefan Robinson

ABSTRACT

The social function of sport has traditionally been to develop an economically efficient workforce and to prevent young men from becoming effeminate, and by extension homosexual. However, since the 1980s both the social positioning of homosexuality has changed, as has the economic requirements of the Anglo-American workforce. As such, the social function of contemporary sport is negated. With modern athletes now opting for softer masculine presentations, we start the debate on the intersection of sport, health, and inclusive masculinities, an area lacking scholarly attention so far. Through exploring masculinity-challenging discourses, participation rates and athletes’ self-withdrawal from sport when injured, we begin to theorize how modern athletes may view potentially risky and injurious sporting activities, suggesting that boys today are less inclined to engage in injurious activities, and, when they do, opting for softer and safer strategies.

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Donna Robinson Divine

John J. Mearsheimer and Stephen M. Walt, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007).

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The Adventures of Miss Brown, Miss Jones and Miss Robinson

tourist writing and tourist performance from 1860 to 1914

Jill Steward

Judith Adler has described travel as an art of performance (Adler 1989a: 1368), a way of ‘world-making’, in which the corporeal and discursive strategies adopted by the traveller moving through space from one place to another utilise the equivalent of classic aesthetic devices in the construction of the narrative through which the journey is registered and the realities it evokes for the audience whose presence is implied by the metaphor (1382–3). The audience too plays a role in the creative process in that its particular expectations constitute ‘one source of explicitly articulated standards of performance’ (1378).

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Rogue or Lover

Value-Maximizing Interpretations of Withnail and I

Peter Alward

Withnail and I (Bruce Robinson, 1987) is a well-known British cult film. It tells the story of two out-of-work, alcoholic actors—Withnail and Marwood—in London at the end of the 1960s. The film is largely centered on the audacious antics of the