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Appalling Tehran

Translation of the French Serial Story and Its Effect on the Persian Serial Story

Manizheh Abdollahi and Ehya Amalsaleh

This article examines French-Iranian literary interactions in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, which arguably had ongoing effects in Iran on attitudes towards links between morality and social and economic inequality. Some of the earliest fictional stories published in Persian-language newspapers, in the 1850s, were French. This trend continued, through Iran’s Constitutional Revolution (1906), into the early decades of the twentieth century. During this period, Morteza Moshfeq-e Kazemi began writing the first Persian serial story and novel, Tehran-e Makhuf (Appalling Tehran). The present study investigates the effects of the translation of French serial stories on Persian ones, with a specific focus on the impact of the novel Les Mystères de Paris (1842– 1843), by Eugène Sue, on the Persian novel Tehran-e Makhuf (1924).

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Perspectives on Cinema and Comics

Adapting Feature Films into French-Language Comics Serials during the Post-war Years

Alain Boillat

This article focuses on the relatively little-known editorial context of children’s French-language comics serials at a time when they constituted the main distribution channel of the bande dessinée medium (before the album became the dominant format), from the immediate post-war years to the mid-1950s. I examine the importance given to the adaptation of films into bande dessinée by studying the editorial strategy to which this practice of adaptation contributes (focusing on the magazine L’Intrépide [The daredevil], which, at the time, specialised in adaptation) and the narrative and figurative aspects of the adapters’ approaches. I show in particular how bandes dessinées are inscribed in genres that structure the periodical publications, where these were previously established in the cinematographic domain such as the swashbuckler and the western. The processes of condensation or amplification of the narrative, as well as the use of the feuilleton, are at the centre of the case studies.

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Ronald Aronson

It might seem that Sartre's thought is no longer relevant in understanding and combating the maelstrom unleashed by triumphant neoliberalism. But we can still draw inspiration from Sartre's hatred of oppression and his project to understand how his most famous theme of individual self-determination and responsibility coexists with our social belonging and determination by historical forces larger than ourselves. Most important today is Sartre's understanding in Critique of Dialectical Reason of how isolated, serial individuals form into groups to resist oppression, and the ways in which these groups generate social understandings and collective power.

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Christopher Turner

What is counter-finality? Who, or what, is the agent of counter-finality? In the Critique of Dialectical Reason, Sartre employs a complicated and multivalent notion of counter-finality, the reversal of the finality intended by an agent in different contexts and at different levels of complexity. Sartre's concept of counter-finality is read here as an attempt to rethink and broaden the traditional Marxist notion of commodity fetishism as a tragic dialectic of human history whose final act has yet to play out. The article analyses and explicates Sartre's complex concept of counter-finality, focusing on material antipraxis.

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Les journaux francophones au dix-neuvième siècle

Entre enjeux locaux et perspective globale

Guillaume Pinson

This article discusses the circulation of francophone news, information, and literary content between Western Europe and North America in the nineteenth century. During this period, big metropolitan cities (Paris, Brussels, Montreal, New Orleans) were forming a dense media network. For the western Atlantic region, New York City and the Courrier des États-Unis (1828–1938) served as the hub of this network. Francophone readers on both sides of the Atlantic shared a large common corpus, including works such as Eugène Sue’s Mystères de Paris (1842–1843), which was distributed in North America by the literary supplement of the Courrier. By providing a general overview of this French-speaking network, this article invites scholars to explore how texts, and literature in particular, operated through an interlinked dynamic system of publication rather than as independent unconnected works.

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Ilana Tahan

Among the great world libraries, the British Library stands out as one of the

major repositories of Hebrew manuscripts and printed books. The Hebrew

collection comprises the library’s holdings of material written and printed in

Hebrew characters, ranging from manuscripts copied over a millennium ago to

the most recent monographs and serials. It consists of over 3,000 manuscript

volumes and some 10,000 Genizah fragments, around 70,000 printed book

titles and nearly 1,000 serial titles. Although Hebrew is the predominant

language, other Jewish languages that utilize the Hebrew script are also

represented in the collection. These include Aramaic, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-

Italian, Judeo-Persian, Judeo-Spanish or Ladino and various others.

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A 'base and spurious thing'

Reading and Deceptive Femininity in Ellen Wood's Parkwater (1857)

Janice M. Allan

Concentrating on Ellen Wood's Parkwater, a little-known New Monthly Magazine serial, this article attempts to complicate the long-standing construction of Wood as a 'quiet sensationalist'. It argues that Wood's serial was self-consciously appealing to the New Monthly's male readers and thus incorporated scenes and details of a surprisingly graphic nature. At the same time, the article situates the narrative within the context of a new commodity culture, as well as the 1857 murder trial of Madeleine Smith, suggesting that Wood's exploration of deceptive femininity resonates with current events in a particularly insistent manner.

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Jason Gendler

This article addresses how television narratives create psychologically rich situations, those moments where viewers are able to make many distinctive and sophisticated inferences about the mental states of characters. Focusing on season five of Mad Men, it examines the extent to which individual episodes create rich situations through the information established within an individual episode, versus the degree to which rich situations are created by relying on information accrued over the course of previous episodes, as well as the extent to which these two kinds of information are blended together in a given situation. While it is easy to assume that serial narratives routinely call upon accumulated character knowledge in order to enrich viewer inferences, somewhat surprisingly, most episodes in Mad Men season five are actually largely enriched through episodic rather than serial information. The article also analyzes interesting patterns that emerge in these qualities across the entire season.

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T. Storm Heter

This article presents a novel defense of Sartrean ethics based on the concept of interpersonal recognition. The immediate post-war texts Anti-Semite and Jew, What is Literature? and Notebooks for an Ethics express Sartre's inchoate yet ultimately defensible view of obligations to others. Such obligations are not best understood as Kantian duties, but rather as Hegelian obligations of mutual recognition. The emerging portrait of Sartrean ethics offers a strong reply to the classical criticism that authenticity would license vicious lifestyles like serial killing. In addition to acting with clarity and responsibility, existentially authentic individuals must respect others.

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Sabine Zubarik

This article deals with experimental novels that offer paradigmatic narrative material on a formal level. It focuses on the reader’s task to choose certain reading paths, and lists a typology of various formats which authors of contemporary literature have deployed (forking-paths-narrations, typo- and topographical layout, double-sided books, loose orders and serial writing). Mark Z. Danielewski’s novel Only Revolutions (2006) serves as an example for a many-sided book which asks the reader to engage in continuous operations of turning, whereas chapter 34 from Julio Cortázar’s novel Rayuela (1963) [Hopscotch] is a model for investigating intra- and intertextual interferences in analogy with the double-slit-experiment familiar from physics. Finally, the article proposes a rethinking of the term ‘experimental novel’ and suggests instead the term ‘actualistic literature’, coined by Susan Strehle in 1992, in order to acknowledge the structural outcome of these novels as a new aesthetic form of realism.