Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 186 items for :

Clear All
Full access

Paul Apostolidis, William E. Connolly, Jodi Dean, Jade Schiff and Romand Coles

Romand Coles, Visionary Pragmatism: Radical and Ecological Democracy in Neoliberal Times (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2016), 240 pp., ISBN: 978-0-8223-6064-3 Paul Apostolidis, William Connolly, Jodi Dean, Jade Schiff, and Romand Coles

Time, Theater, and Story Dimensions of Intercorporeal Resonance in Romand Coles’s Visionary Pragmatism: Paul Apostolidis

Visionary Responsiveness, Critical Assemblages A Commentary on Visionary Pragmatism: William E. Connolly

Response to Romand Coles’s Visionary Pragmatism: Jodi Dean

Resonant Politics and the Politics of Autoresonance?: Jade Schiff

Response to Symposium on Visionary Pragmatism: Romand Coles

Full access

Adam Rounce

The Complete Poems of William Empson edited by John Haffenden (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2000) ISBN 0713992875 £30.00

Norman Cameron: His Life, Work and Letters by Warren Hope (London: Greenwich Exchange, 2000) ISBN 187155105 6 £20.00

Full access

Vassiliki Markidou

This article analyses William Shakespeare’s Macbeth in relation to its main spaces – the heath, Macbeth’s three castles, Macduff’s fortress, and the battleground where Macbeth perishes – in order to shed light on the play’s use of spatial politics by outlining the function and significance of the concept of the palimpsest, while concurrently reading the play within a context that conflates Michel de Certeau’s and Henri Lefebvre’s theories of space. It contends that although castles are supposed to be the bedrocks and shelters for the individuals that inhabit them, hence fixed and static, those in the text are ambiguous and changeable while concurrently they refigure and reinscribe one another. Finally, the article will demonstrate that the playwright invites the audience to ponder on the issues of social responsibility and political power by choosing a spatially palimpsestic framework for his play.

Free access

In Memoriam

W. S. F. Pickering

William Watts Miller

This records the life and work of William Stuart Frederick Pickering (1922–2016), an ordained Anglican priest and internationally acclaimed scholar affectionately known as ‘Bill’, who had a wide range of interests in the fields of sociology and theology, but who came to specialize, through the sociology of religion, in the work of Émile Durkheim, and who founded the British Centre for Durkheimian Studies, the University of Oxford. It includes a bibliography of his major publications and, on behalf of his many friends and colleagues in France, a personal tribute from Professor Jean-Christophe Marcel.

Full access

Brett Holman

In contrast to William Le Queux’s pre-1914 novels about German spies and invasion, his wartime writing is much less well known. Analysis of a number of his works, predominantly non-fictional, written between 1914 and 1918 shows that he modified his perception of the threat posed by Germany in two ways. Firstly, because of the lack of a German naval invasion, he began to emphasise the more plausible danger of aerial attack. Secondly, because of the incompetent handling of the British war effort, he began to believe that an ‘Invisible Hand’ was responsible, consisting primarily of naturalised Germans. Switching form from fiction to non-fiction made his writing more persuasive, but he was not able to sustain this and he ended the war with less influence than he began it.

Full access

Matt Eshleman, Mark William Westmoreland and Yiwei Zheng

Stephen Wang, Aquinas and Sartre: On Freedom, Personal Identity and the Possibility of Happiness Review by Matt Eshleman

Jonathan Judaken, ed. Race After Sartre: Antiracism, African Existentialism, Postcolonialism Review by Mark William Westmoreland

Anthony Hatzimoysis, The Philosophy of Sartre Review by Yiwei Zheng

Full access

William Wilkerson, Adrian van den Hoven and Elizabeth Butterfield

Michelle Darnell, Self in the Theoretical Writings of Sartre and Kant Review by William Wilkerson

Jonathan Judaken, Jean-Paul Sartre and the Jewish Question: Anti-antisemitism and the Politics of the French Intellectual Review by Adrian van den Hoven

Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir A Film Directed by Max Cacopardo Review by Elizabeth Butterfield

Full access

The Adventures of William Hood

Fictions of Shakespeare the Deer Stealer

Paul Franssen

In fiction as in biography, Shakespeare's life is often politicised. Originally, the story of young Shakespeare caught poaching deer and forced to flee Stratford served to illustrate the role of fate in the creation of genius, while his irresponsible behaviour was downplayed. Later, the poaching was represented as rebellion against aristocratic privileges, and even as a deliberate political protest against enclosures of arable land. In more recent fiction, Shakespeare needs to be forced into a social awareness by the deer stealing episode, or even becomes a heartless landlord himself. Thus, Shakespeare's fictional lives reflect political developments in society, from class conflict to cultural levelling.

Free access

William Dressler

In an earlier paper (Dressler, 2001), I suggested that medical anthropology as a research enterprise could not ignore either meaning or structure in human social life in the production of health. Rather, drawing on the early work of Bourdieu, I argued that we need to take into account both how the world is configured by the collective meanings we impose upon it, as well as the social structural (and physical) constraints on our behaviour that exist outside those meanings. Human health can be understood, in part, as the intersection of meaning and structure. Here, my aim is to extend this perspective in three ways. Firstly, I present an expanded theoretical framework within which collectivei meaning and social structure can be conceptualised. A useful theoretical framework must take into account paradoxical features of culture, including the seeming contradiction that it is a property both of social aggregates and of individuals, and that, ultimately, social structural constraints external to individuals depend on shared meaning. Secondly, I review recent research employing this perspective conducted in Brazil, the southern United States and Puerto Rico. These studies have all employed a 'structural-constructivist' theoretical orientation, using especially the concept of 'cultural consonance', or the degree to which individuals incorporate shared meaning into their own beliefs and behaviour. Where individual efforts to attain a higher cultural consonance are frustrated by structural constraints, poor health results. Thirdly, I consider some of the policy implications of this perspective. While much work in traditional public health focuses on a highly individualised notion of meaning (as in 'health beliefs'), it seems unlikely that the health of populations can be altered substantially without taking into account the structures that constrain individual action.

Full access

William Dodd

This article reports on contemporary debates in Germany on the extensive use of English in Germans' use of German. In particular, it focuses on the debate held at the University of Birmingham between Professor Jürgen Schiewe and Thomas Paulwitz on the question: “The influence of English on German today: Grounds for concern?” The rise of a nationalist discourse on language since the mid-1990s is traced with particular reference to the Verein Deutsche Sprache and the quarterly publication Deutsche Sprachwelt. The purist position represented by Paulwitz, editor of Deutsche Sprachwelt, and opposed by Schiewe, Professor of German Philology at the University of Greifswald, is found to represent a discourse on national identity that fails to engage with modern linguistic science.