Mediations of Power in Contemporary Medical Anthropology

in Anthropology in Action
Author:
Paul Brodwin University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee brodwin@uwm.edu

Search for other papers by Paul Brodwin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

The articles in this special issue tackle a problem at the heart of medical anthropology today—a problem that bedevils our methods, theoretical ambitions and public stance in the world. How should we rank the relative importance of local cultural meanings, on the one hand, and large-scale political and economic forces, on the other? That is, how should we train our sights on both culture and politics as we study the social contexts of suffering and apply our expertise to the worlds of policymaking and service delivery? How do we keep ‘culture’ and ‘politics’ in motion (and both are very broad analytical terms) without lapsing into one-sided analyses that champion the one term at the expense of the other? The following articles significantly advance the debate about such issues. They offer powerful theoretical models of the dialectic between culture-specific illness idioms and the operations of power that constrain people’s lives. They also re-think the very notion of culture in light of the complex networks—connecting individuals to nationstates, empires, NGOs, pharmaceutical firms and global capital—in which medical anthropologists increasingly work.

  • Collapse
  • Expand

Anthropology in Action

Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 212 138 49
PDF Downloads 158 46 5