Aspasia

The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women's and Gender History

Founding Editor: Francisca de Haan, Central European University


Subjects: History; Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Studies; Gender Studies; Politics


Call for Papers: Aspasia 15: Queer Histories of Women in CESEE


Berghahn is delighted to announce that Aspasia will be published as an open access journal as of 2019. Thanks to the generous support from a global network of libraries as part of the Knowledge Unlatched Select initiative, there are no submission or article processing charges (APCs) for authors of articles published under this arrangement, resulting in no direct charges to authors.

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 14 (2020): Issue 1 (Mar 2020)

Volume 15 / 2021, 1 issue per volume (March)

Aims & Scope

Aspasia is the international peer-reviewed annual of women’s and gender history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE). It aims to transform European women’s and gender history by expanding comparative research on women and gender to all parts of Europe, creating a European history of women and gender that encompasses more than the traditional Western European perspective. Aspasia particularly emphasizes research that examines the ways in which gender intersects with other categories of social organization and advances work that explores transnational aspects of women’s and gender histories within, to, and from CESEE. The journal also provides an important outlet for the publication of articles by scholars working in CESEE itself. Its contributions cover a rich variety of topics and historical eras, as well as a wide range of methodologies and approaches to the history of women and gender.


Read the founding statement from the first issue of Aspasia here.


Submissions are welcome on all topics related to women's and gender history in CESEE on an ongoing basis.

In keeping with the current scholarly debates, in conversation with scholars from all over the world, Aspasia brings to an international audience innovative research and historical analyses. This important publication not only offers valuable materials for easy integration into the teaching of graduate and undergraduate courses, but also provides up-to-date information and analyses on books that focus on women's and gender history, in particular those published in the languages of this area, which otherwise rarely receive attention in English-language history journals.


Indexing/Abstracting

Aspasia is indexed/abstracted in:

  • America: History and Life
  • British Humanities Index
  • Current Abstracts
  • European Reference Index for the Humanities and the Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS)
  • Feminist Periodicals
  • Genderwatch
  • Historical Abstracts (excludes N. America)
  • Index Islamicus
  • International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (IBR)
  • International Bibliography of Periodical Literature (IBZ)
  • MLA Directory of Periodicals
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • MLA Master List of Periodicals
  • Scopus
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • TOC Premier

Editors
Sharon Kowalsky, Texas A&M University-Commerce, USA (Senior Editor)
Krassimira Daskalova, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, Bulgaria (Book Review Editor)
Valentina Mitkova, St. Kliment Ohridski University of Sofia, Bulgaria (Assistant Book Review Editor)

Eleni Fournaraki, University of Crete, Greece
Dobrochna Kalwa, University of Warsaw, Poland
Genitana Kera, University of Tirana, Albania
Oksana Kis, Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine
Mara Lazda, Bronx Community College, City University of New York, USA
Jill Massino, University of North Carolina Charlotte, USA
Marianna Muravyeva, University of Helsinki, Finland
Rochelle Ruthchild, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University, USA

Editorial Board

Gisela Bock, Free University of Berlin, Germany
Maria Bucur, Indiana University, USA
Natalie Zemon Davis, Princeton University, USA, and the University of Toronto, Canada
Melissa Feinberg, Rutgers University, USA
Malgorzata Fidelis, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA
Elena Gapova, European Humanities University - EHU International (Belarus), Romania
Katherine Jolluck, Stanford University, USA
Irina Livezeanu, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Jasmina Lukic, Central European University, Hungary
Natalia Pushkareva, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
Bonnie G. Smith, Rutgers University, USA

Founding Editor: Francisca de Haan, Central European University, Hungary

 

Manuscript Submission

Please carefully review the submission and style guide PDF here before submitting.

Aspasia License Agreement can be found here.

Each volume of Aspasia contains (1) an article section that is sometimes thematic and (2) book reviews and essays. Aspasia regularly features (3) a discussion Forum (whose topic in most cases will be related to the central theme of the volume) and/or (4) the rubric the Source, in which important original sources (or parts of them) are introduced and translated into English.

To submit an article and for questions about submissions, please contact:
Sharon Kowalsky | aspasia.editor@gmail.com

For book reviews or questions and suggestions about book reviews, please contact:
Krassimira Daskalova | krasi@sclg.uni-sofia.bg

Aspasia does not accept translations of articles previously published in other languages. Any submission based on previously published work in any language must be substantially revised from the original version. Manuscripts that do not meet these criteria will be rejected. Submissions without complete and properly formatted reference lists may be rejected. Manuscripts accepted for publication that do not conform to the Aspasia style will be returned to the author for amendment.

Have other questions? Please refer to the various Berghahn Info for Authors pages for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors.


Ethics Statement

Authors published in Aspasia (ASP) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all articles have been subjected to double-blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. Editorial introductions, book reviews, forum essays, and some types of commentary are not subject to the peer-review process. While the publishers and the editorial board make every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make clear that the data, and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of their authors. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete Aspasia ethics statement.

Annual Subscriptions

Volume 15/2021, 1 issue p.a. (March)
ISSN 1933-2882 (Print) · ISSN 1933-2890 (Online)
(rates include handling & surface postage)

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2021 Pricing

*Price freeze at 2020 rates

Institutional Rate (Print)
$126.00 / £82.00 / €100.00

Individual print subscriptions are available. Please contact Berghahn for pricing.

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Don't have a subscription? Find other ways to access the journal here, or recommend the journal to your library.

Author: Mihaela Miroiu

I shall appeal to a concept I consider regulative for political, moral, and cultural feminism: women’s autonomy. When autonomy is undermined by patriarchy, there is no gender-fair competition, nor a real gender partnership. It means that feminism can only attain its goals when women have the capacity to rule over their own welfare, freed from oppressive patriarchal, androcratic, and andromorphic cultural, moral, and political constraints.

From West to East

International Women's Day, the First Decade

The year 2010 was the centennial of Clara Zetkin's proposal for an annual women's holiday, which became known as International Women's Day, and 2011 was the centennial of its first celebrations. The first ten years of the holiday's existence were a particularly tumultuous time in world history, with the advent of World War I, revolutionary upheavals in some of the major combatant countries, and the demise of the German, Habsburg, Ottoman, and Russian empires. During this time, International Women's Day celebrations quickly gained great popularity, and in 1917 sparked the February Russian Revolution. This article focuses on the development of the holiday from its U.S. and Western European origins and goal of women's suff rage, to its role in empowering Russian women to spark a revolution, and its re-branding as a Soviet communist celebration. Special attention is paid to the roles of two prominent international socialist women leaders, Zetkin and Alexandra Kollontai, in shaping the holiday's evolution.

This study argues that the changing relationship between paid work, unpaid work and paid care work and social services, and the struggle over this relationship and its implications, constituted key factors in shaping the ‘state socialist’ gender regime in Hungary from 1949 to the 1980s. The study is based on a wealth of recent scholarship, original sources and Hungarian research conducted during the state socialist period. It tries to give a balanced and inclusive analysis of key elements of women’s and gender history in the state socialist project of ‘catching-up development’ in a semi-peripheral patriarchal society, pointing to constraints, challenges and results of this project. Due to the complex interaction of a variety of actors and factors impacting on and shaping the state socialist gender regime not all women were affected in the same way by state socialist politics and gender struggles. Women’s status and opportunities, as well as gender relations, differed according to class, ethnicity and economic sector. As a rule, the gender struggle over state socialist family and gender arrangements in Hungary sought to reduce or temper tensions and conflicts by avoiding substantial or direct attack against the privileges of men both within the home and elsewhere.

Feminism and Feminist History-Writing in Turkey

The Discovery of Ottoman Feminism

Author: Serpil Çakır

The formation of a feminist consciousness and memory in Turkey coincided with a historical period in which both social movements and academic studies proliferated. Towards the end of the 1980s, the increasing number of women's organisations and publications began to impact upon both the feminist movement and academic research in the area of women's studies. This, combined with the expansion of the civil societal realm, has resulted in many topics and issues related to women becoming part of the public discussion, thereby contributing to the development of a new feminist consciousness. This article discusses the impact of the work in the field of women's history and the ensuing discovery of an Ottoman feminism on the formation of such a feminist consciousness and memory in Turkey.

The Cold War era has been mainly represented as a period of gender conservatism in feminist literature, and communist women in Eastern and Western Europe have been often described as manipulated or deprived of agency due to their lack of autonomy from Communist Party politics. On the basis of archival sources and autobiographies, this article explores the Cold War activities of a women's organization founded in Yugoslavia during the Second World War: the Antifašistički Front Žena (Antifascist Women's Front, or AFŽ). The article describes the activities of the AFŽ from its creation until its dissolution in 1953, focusing on its campaigns for women's political, economic, and social rights in the postwar and early Cold War period. By engaging with the pioneering work of Zagreb feminist historian Lydia Sklevicky and with new archival sources, the article aims to shed light on women's political and social agency in Cold War times.