Critical Survey

Editor: Graham Holderness, University of Hertfordshire


Subjects: English-language Literature


 Available on JSTOR  


Browse the Editor's selection of recent issue covers!

Call for Papers: Shakespeare and Rome

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 33 (2021): Issue 2 (Jun 2021): Shakespeare and the Modern Novel

Volume 33 / 2021, 4 issues per volume (spring, summer, autumn, winter)

Aims & Scope

Critical Survey addresses central issues of critical practice and literary theory in a language that is clear, concise, and accessible, with a primary focus on Renaissance and Modern writing and culture. The journal combines criticism with creative writing, including poetry, providing an essential resource for everyone involved in the field of literary studies.

"A superb journal, fast becoming 'required reading', especially for those interested in cutting-edge work in early modern studies." —Barbara Hodgdon, Drake University

"A lively, inventive and eminently readable journal." —Catherine Belsey


Indexing/Abstracting

Critical Survey is indexed/abstracted in:

  • Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature (Proquest)
  • Arts & Humanities Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • Bibliometric Research Indicator List (BFI)
  • Biography Index (Ebsco)
  • British Humanities Index (Proquest)
  • Currant Contents  Arts & Humanities (Web of Science)
  • Humanities Abstracts (Ebsco)
  • Humanities Index  (Ebsco)
  • IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • MLA Directory of Periodicals
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • Periodicals Index Online (Proquest)
  • ProQuest Research Library (Proquest)
  • Scopus (Elsevier)

Editor: Graham Holderness, University of Hertfordshire, UK

Poetry Editors:
John Lucas, Nottingham Trent University, UK
Ben Parker

Editorial Board:
Yousef Awad, University of Jordan
Catherine Belsey, Swansea University, UK
Terri Bourous, Florida State University, USA
Michael Bristol, McGill University, Canada
Peter Brooker, University of Nottingham, UK
Dympna Callaghan, Syracuse University, USA
Daniel Cordle, Nottingham Trent University, UK
John Drakakis, University of Stirling, UK
Roger Ebbatson, Lancaster University, UK
Richard L. Godden, University of California, Irvine, USA
Nicholas Grene, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
Sir Derek Jacobi, London, UK
Paulina Kewes, University of Oxford, UK
Richard H. King, University of Nottingham, UK
Dallas Liddle, Augsburg, Germany
Ania Loomba, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Leah Marcus, Vanderbilt University, USA
Annabel Patterson, Yale University, USA
Ruth Robbins, Leeds Beckett University, UK
Antony Rowland, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
Stan Smith, Nottingham Trent University, UK
Paul Stevens, University of Toronto, Canada
Tian Yuan Tan, University of Oxford, UK
Cedric Watts, University of Sussex, UK
Stanley Wells, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, UK

 

Manuscript Submissions

Please review the submission and style guidelines carefully before submitting.

The editors welcome submissions of articles in the general fields of modern and early modern literature and culture—especially articles that indicate a clear familiarity with current critical and theoretical thinking. Submissions should generally be between 5,000 and 7,000 words in length, though exceptionally strong longer pieces will also be considered. Submissions should be e-mailed to the editor at grahamholderness@gmail.com

To submit poems for consideration, please send three or four to criticalsurveypoetry@gmail.com.

Manuscript Preparation

Submissions should be e-mailed as Microsoft Word files and may initially be supplied in any internationally recognized academic style. After the article is accepted for publication, it is the author’s responsibility to convert the text into the journal’s house style, available here. Each submission must be accompanied by a short abstract and a brief author biography including institutional affiliation and contact details.

Have other questions? Please refer to the Berghahn Info for Authors page for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors.


Ethics Statement

Authors published in Critical Survey (CS) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews and some types of commentary, have been subjected to double-blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While the publishers and the editorial board make every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete CS ethics statement.

Annual Subscriptions

Volume 33/2021, 4 issues p.a. (spring, summer, winter)
ISSN 0011-1570 (Print) • ISSN 1752-2293 (Online)
(rates include handling & surface postage)

Free Sample Issue
Recommend to Your Library

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Shakespeare &

berghahnbooks.com/series/shakespeare-and

Editor:

Graham Holderness, University of Hertfordshire

Shakespeare is everywhere, permeating culture at every level; yet it is less well-recognized that culture also permeates Shakespeare. Shakespeare & explores Shakespeare and his work outside the lens of traditional literary studies. By intersecting the worlds beyond fiction and poetry with those disciplines outside of literature and drama, this series offers nuanced approaches that reveal a more diverse and complex legacy left by Shakespeare.

'Reading for Life'

Prison Reading Groups in Practice and Theory

This article considers the theoretical and practice-based evidence for the therapeutic effects of the shared reading of literature (poetry, fiction, plays, short stories) in prison communities. Taking as its starting point recent research and practice relating to the successful intervention ('Get into Reading') pioneered by UK charity The Reader Organisation, the article situates the components of this model in the context of established theories of reader response, as well as new research on reading and the brain. Yet its focus is always shared reading in practice and, through specific examples and testimony from prisoners and those who read with them (including health professionals), the article demonstrates the vital relation of this intervention to current recommendations in respect of the mental health needs of prisoners. It also offers a possible model for future interdisciplinary research in this field.

Author: Jim Clarke

J.G. Ballard's early novels The Drowned World (1962) and The Crystal World (1966) take a climatological approach to apocalyptic dystopia. This has led survey studies of climate fiction to identify these novels as founding texts of the genre. Yet Ballard wrote in an era before global warming had been identified by climate scientists, and his fiction is as much psychological and ontological as it is physiological. Ballard both adheres to and deviates from the global warming narrative now accepted by contemporary climatology, working within and beyond the SF subgenre of post-apocalyptic fiction. This paper assesses the extent to which these dystopian narratives can be understood as climate fiction and explores the debt that more recent cli-fi may owe to Ballard.

Author: Michael Wilding

Henry stood groaning in front of the pigeonholes, holding out a letter in one hand in passable imitation of Hamlet. ‘Good news from your agent?’ asked Dr Bee. ‘Agent, what agent?’ said Henry. ‘My agent is a secret agent. She doesn’t reveal her existence to me or mine to any publisher. No, there’s this letter saying Rollo said to get in touch with me and thanking me for arranging lunch and I can’t read the signature. Can’t remember arranging any lunch’.

Demons into Angels?

Corporate Social Responsibility and Media Organisations

Author: Ágnes Gulyás

This article examines interpretations of the ideal media corporation by analysing corporate social responsibility engagement and communication of the largest media organisations in the world between 2000 and 2009. The study found that CSR engagement and communication are relatively limited and narrow among these firms, hence it is not surprising that public trust about them is low and perceptions of these organisations as 'demons' to society are widespread. Although CSR communication of multinational media companies has increased during the last decade, this was from a very low level of reporting and likely to have been mainly the result of organisations in the sector responding to a general trend in the corporate world towards a greater emphasis on CSR. The article argues that the increase in CSR communication arguably is part of a PR effort to improve the companies' image rather than a genuine transformation of the organisations to try to live up to the expectations of the ideal media corporation.

Under the Sign of the Gun

Welcome to the Postmodern Melancholy of Gordimer's Post-Apartheid World

Author: Simon Lewis

Raymond Chandler used to say that whenever he got stuck writing a novel he would get going again by having a character come through the door with a gun in hand. Reading the opening pages of Nadine Gordimer’s new novel with its account of a sensational murder, one might wonder whether South Africa’s 1991 Nobel laureate, faced with the end of apartheid and the consequent lack of a subject, was operating according to Chandler’s principle. The House Gun, however, indicates not so much the lack of a subject as a new way of looking at an old subject facing new circumstances – the old subject being the psychological and material effects of white racism on whites, the new circumstances being those of post-apartheid South Africa. Moreover, the apparent narrowing of focus from the macropolitics of Gordimer’s three most recent preceding novels, None to Accompany Me (1994), My Son’s Story (1990), and A Sport of Nature (1987), to the micro-politics of The House Gun suggests that we can read South Africa’s transition to full democracy as a paradigmatic change from a modern to a postmodern condition. Gordimer’s post- 1994 publications, and The House Gun in particular, lend themselves to being read as illustrative of two of Michel Foucault’s central insights: the ubiquity of power, and the consequent idea that given that ubiquity, care of one’s self (‘souci de soi’) becomes a new kind of political obligation.