Durkheimian Studies

Études Durkheimiennes

Editors: W. Watts Miller and Jean-Christophe Marcel


Subjects: Sociology, Anthropology


 Available on JSTOR


Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 24 (2020): Issue 1 (Dec 2020)

Durkheimian Studies 
Volume 25

Durkheim Thought of the International

Introduction
Decolonising Durkheimian Conceptions of the International: Colonialism and Inter-Nationalism in the Durkheimian School during and after the Colonial Era
Grégoire Mallard and Jean Terrier

Special Section
Durkheim, the Action Française and the Question of Nationalism
Sue Stedman-Jones

The Gift of the Nation: Marcel Mauss and the Intersocial Turn of Sociology
Francesco Callegaro

Malinowski and Mauss Exchanging Knowledge in Interwar Europe: Lessons in Internationalism
Leo Coleman

‘Nothing Is Less Universal than the Idea of Race’: Alfred Métraux, American Social Science and UNESCO’s Anti-Racist Campaign in 1950s Paris
Alice L. Conklin

General Articles
From Neo-Kantianism to Durkheimian Sociology: Hermann Cohen and the Problem of Sacrifice 
Stephen Turner 

Frenchman, Jew, Positivist: Reading the Rules and Mapping Émile Durkheim in Germany
Wiebke Keim

The Gift and Open Science
Henrik Egbert

La typologie des crimes de Durkheim dans ses Leçons de sociologie criminelle (1892/1893)
Matthieu Béra

Volume 25 / 2021, 1 issue per volume (winter)

Aims & Scope

Durkheimian Studies / Études Durkheimiennes is the scholarly journal of the British Centre for Durkheimian Studies. It is concerned with all aspects of the work of Durkheim and his group, such as Marcel Mauss and Robert Hertz, and with the contemporary development and application of their ideas to issues in the social sciences, religion and philosophy. The journal is unique in often featuring first-time or new English translations of their French works otherwise not available to English-language scholars.


Indexing/Abstracting

Durkheimian Studies is indexed/abstracted in:

  • Anthropological Index Online (RAI)
  • Bibliometric Research Indicator List (BFI)
  • Current Abstracts (EBSCO)
  • IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature (De Gruyter)
  • MLA Directory of Periodicals
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • MLA Master List of Periodicals
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • Scopus (Elsevier)
  • Social Services Abstracts (CSA/ProQuest)
  • SocINDEX (EBSCO)
  • Sociological Abstracts (CSA/Pro/Quest)
  • TOC Premier Table of Contents (EBSCO)
  • WorldCat
  • Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (CSA/ProQuest)

Editors: W. Watts Miller and Jean-Christophe Marcel, University of Bourgogne, France

Assistant Editor
Matthieu Béra, University of Bordeaux, France
Jean-François Bert, University of Lausanne, Switzerland
François Pizarro-Noël, University of Quebec, Canada

Editorial Board:
S. Baciocchi, British Centre for Durkheimian Studies and École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales,UK
S. Stedman Jones, British Centre for Durkheimian Studies, UK
K. Thompson, the Open University, UK

International Board of Editorial Consultants:
M. Achimastos, University of Crete, Greece
M. Borlandi, University of Turin, Italy
M. Consolim, University of Saõ Paulo, Brazil
R. P. Datta, University of Windsor, Canada
M. Dawson, University of Glasgow, UK
M. Dhermy-Mairal, University of Geneva, Switzerland
A. Erdogan-Coskun, University of Istanbul, Turkey
J. L. Fabiani, Central European University, Hungary
M. Fournier, University of Montreal, Canada
A. Gofman, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia
T. Grande, University of Calabria, Italy
S. Hausner, University of Oxford, UK
R. Leroux, University of Ottawa, Canada
S. Lukes, New York University, USA
A. Maryanski, University of California Riverside, USA
D. Merllié, EHESS, Paris, France
L. Migliorati, University of Verona, Italy
G. Paoletti, University of Pisa, Italy
A. Pettenkofer, University of Erfurt, Germany
M. Plouviez, Université of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France
A. Rawls, Bentley University, USA
G. Rygh, University of Oslo, Norway
J. Schick, University of Cologne, Germany
M. Schmidt, University of Cologne, Germany
S. Stedman-Jones, UK
S. Turner, University of South Florida, USA
J. Zhang, Southeast University, Nanjing, China

 

Manuscript Submission

Please review the submission and style guide carefully before submitting.

Contact

All contributions are externally refereed by scholars of international repute. E-mail submissions are encouraged for quicker response time, but mailed contributions will be reviewed. All mailed submissions must include two hard copies and the corresponding electronic files on a PC formatted disc. Articles should normally be 7,000 to 9,000 words (including notes and references).

Contributions, in French or English, should be sent to the editor at: wwattsmiller@gmail.com

or

Editor
The Durkheim Press
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St. James, Bristol
BS6 5UQ, UK

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Ethics Statement

Authors published in Durkheimian Studies (DS) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews, and some types of commentary, have been subjected to double-blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While every effort is made by the publishers and the editorial board to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make it clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete DS Ethics Statement.

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Publications of the Durkheim Press

berghahnbooks.com/series/durkheimian-press

Editor:

William Watts Miller

Durkheim Press came into being in 1996 with the intention of publishing books by Durkheim and members of the Année Sociologique group. For more information about the press, please visit The British Centre for Durkheimian Studies homepage.

Author: Émile Durkheim

Although sociology is defined as the science of society, in reality it cannot deal with human groups, which are the immediate concern of its research, without in the end tackling the individual, the ultimate element of which these groups are composed. For society cannot constitute itself unless it penetrates individual consciousnesses and fashions them 'in its image and likeness'; so, without wanting to be over-dogmatic, it can be said with confidence that a number of our mental states, including some of the most essential, have a social origin. Here it is the whole that, to a large extent, constitutes the part; hence it is impossible to try to explain the whole without explaining the part, if only as an after-effect. The product par excellence of collective activity is the set of intellectual and moral goods called civilization; this is why Auguste Comte made sociology the science of civilization. But, in another aspect, it is civilization that has made man into what he is; it is this that distinguishes him from the animal. Man is man only because he is civilized. To look for the causes and conditions on which civilization depends is therefore to look, as well, for the causes and conditions of what, in man, is most specifically human. This is how sociology, while drawing on psychology, which it cannot do without, brings to this, in a just return, a contribution that equals and exceeds in importance the services it receives from it. It is only through historical analysis that it is possible to understand what man is formed of; for it is only in the course of history that he has taken form.

A Durkheimian Account of Globalization

The Construction of Global Moral Culture

Author: David Inglis

What might Durkheim's writings teach us today about the nature of globalization processes and a globalized world condition? This paper contends that Durkheim has a great deal of relevance for social scientific understandings of contemporary globalization. His distinctive contribution involved understanding the genesis and nature of a world-level moral culture. This vision entailed a significant sociological recasting of Kant's cosmopolitan political philosophy. The paper reconstructs Durkheim's account of world moral culture from writings that stretch throughout his career. For each of the major texts considered, the paper points out some of the important intellectual antecedents that Durkheim may have drawn upon, or which have notable resonances with what he was endeavouring to achieve. The overall argument is that the Durkheimian vision of globalization stands as a major corrective to radical critiques of globalization which reduce it to being a simple product of capitalism and imperialism. The moral dimensions of globalization have to be considered as much as these factors, which the paper takes to be Durkheim's major lesson for globalization studies today.

Among the many theories of socialization, that of Durkheim stands out. While most analyses of socialization are individualistic, that of Durkheim is holistic. This singularity presents a challenge to the modern mind, which is dominated by individualism. Reading Durkheim's analysis of socialization, like the rest of his work, requires the difficult task of overcoming one's natural tendency to do so through an individualistic lens. This paper is an attempt to restore the original holistic meaning of this analysis. It aims to correct some of Durkheim's commentators' re-interpretations of his views and the everyday language that he uses in individualistic terms. Particular attention is given to Durkheim's distinction between authority and power. This distinction has huge implications for Durkheim's interpretation of socialization, which he sees as a process that primarily involves a particular relationship - one that he describes in terms of 'submission' - with the authority of society.

Durkheim's Lost Argument (1895–1955)

Critical Moves on Method and Truth

Durkheim’s course of twenty lectures on pragmatism, given at the Sorbonne during the academic year 1913 to 1914, has been regularly reassessed, particularly since an apparently complete English translation (1983). Far from being marginal in Durkheim’s work, as claimed by Steven Lukes (1973), the lectures seem central for understanding Durkheim’s epistemology and methodology. This was initially set out in his two doctoral theses – the main one on the division of labour (1893) – then substantially reworked in later writings, particularly Les Formes élémentaires (1912). Unfortunately, we know the lectures only from a posthumous reconstruction by the faithful Durkheimian and sympathiser with Marxism, the philosopher Armand Cuvillier, who published Pragmatisme et sociologie in 1955, drawing on two anonymous sets of ‘student notes’ that later disappeared. It is thus difficult to know the scope and effect of Cuvillier’s own rewriting of these notes. Moreover, he made his reconstruction forty-two years after the actual presentation by Durkheim at the Sorbonne. The sociological context in France was by this time entirely different. The most prominent sociologists, such as Jean Stoetzel, were outspoken anti-Durkheimians in their demand for an empirical knowledge clearly severed from any philosophical foundation. The Durkheimians who tried to pursue the founder’s endeavour in the interwar period were dead. The very first reviews of Cuvillier’s edition indicate that Durkheimianism seemed to belong to the intellectual past, at least since the death of Marcel Mauss in 1950.

Durkheim's account of the categories is re-examined, in a critique of the fundamentally mistaken and philosophically uninformed interpretation put forward in Rawls's Epistemology and Practice (2004). This converts Durkheim into a pragmatist, even a behaviourist, more or less reducing conscience to an epiphenomenon of sounds, movements, and socially generated raw emotions. She bypasses the key role of representations and symbols, while her emphasis on collective 'forces' ignores Durkheim's concern with power as puissance and with the creativity of an effervescent fusion of energies. Thus action is central to his account of the categories, but not in the terms offered by Rawls. For action involves the full range of the functions of conscience. And these come into play through the power of representations and symbols, as an integral part of a whole creative fusion of energies and consciences in the 'dynamogenics' of collective action.