German Politics and Society

Editor: Jeffrey J. Anderson, Georgetown University


Subjects: German Studies, Politics, Sociology, History, Economics, Cultural Studies


 Available on JSTOR


A joint publication of the BMW Center for German and European Studies (of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University) and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). These centers are represented by their directors on the journal's Editorial Committee.

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 38 (2020): Issue 4 (Dec 2020)

German Politics & Society 39(1)
Table of Contents

Special Issue
Myths of Innocence in German Public Memory
Guest Editors: Jonathan Bach and Benjamin Nienass

Jonathan Bach and Benjamin Nienass
Introduction

Mikkel Dack
Tailoring Truth: Memory Construction and Whitewashing the Nazi Past from Below

Susanne Baackmann
Undoing the Myth of Childhood Innocence in Gisela Elsner’s Fliegeralarm

Susanne Vees-Gulani
Symbol of Reconciliation and Far-Right Stronghold? PEGIDA, AfD, and Memory Culture in Dresden

Florian Helfer
(Post-)colonial Myths in German History Textbooks, 1989–2015

Jonathan Bach
Brand of Brothers? The Humboldt Forum and the Myths of Innocence

Volume 39 / 2021, 4 issues per volume (spring, summer, autumn, winter)

Aims & Scope

German Politics and Society is a joint publication of the BMW Center for German and European Studies (of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University) and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). These centers are represented by their directors on the journal's Editorial Committee.

German Politics and Society is a peer-reviewed journal published and distributed by Berghahn Journals. It is the only American publication that explores issues in modern Germany from the combined perspectives of the social sciences, history, and cultural studies.

The journal provides a forum for critical analysis and debate about politics, history, film, literature, visual arts, and popular culture in contemporary Germany. Every issue includes contributions by renowned scholars commenting on recent books about Germany.


Indexing/Abstracting

German Politics and Society is indexed/abstracted in:

  • Bibliometric Research Indicator List (BFI)
  • Biography Index (Ebsco)
  • British Humanities Index (Proquest)
  • Columbia International Affairs Online (CIAO)
  • Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • European Reference Index for the Humanities and the Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS)
  • Historical Abstracts (Ebsco)
  • International Political Science Abstracts
  • IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • PAIS International Public Affairs (Proquest)
  • Periodicals Index Online (PIO)— (Proquest)
  • Political Science Complete (Ebsco)
  • Proquest Research Library (Proquest)
  • Scopus (Elsevier)
  • Social Services Abstracts (Proquest)
  • Sociological Abstracts (Proquest)
  • Sociological Collection (Ebsco)
  • SocINDEX (Ebsco)
  • Social Sciences Abstracts (Ebsco)
  • Violence & Abuse Abstracts (Ebsco)
  • Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (Proquest)

Editor: Jeffrey J. Anderson, Georgetown University, USA

Managing Editor/Book Review Editor: Eric Langenbacher, Georgetown University, USA

Editorial Board:
Leslie Adelson, Cornell University, USA
Jonathan Bach, The New School, USA
Beverly Crawford, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Russell J. Dalton, University of California, Irvine, USA
Louise K. Davidson-Schmich, University of Miami, USA
Richard Deeg, Temple University, USA
Mary Fulbrook, University College London, UK
Hope Harrison, George Washington University, USA
Dagmar Herzog, The Graduate Center, CUNY, USA
Jeffrey Kopstein, University of Toronto, Canada
Charles Maier, Harvard University, USA
Sabine von Mering, Brandeis University, UKA
Joyce M. Mushaben, University of Missouri, St. Louis, USA
Todd Presner, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
Susan Scarrow, University of Houston, USA
Katrin Sieg, Georgetown University, USA
Stephen Silvia, American University, USA
Hilary Silver, Brown University, USA
Helga Welsh, Wake Forest University, USA
Sarah Wiliarty, Wesleyan University, USA
Jennifer Yoder, Colby College, USA
Daniel Ziblatt, Harvard University, USA

German Politics and Society, published by Berghahn Books, is a joint publication of the BMW Center for German and European Studies of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), 871 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY.

The directors of the following North American programs and centers associated with the DAAD serve on the journal's Editorial Board as ex-officio members:

  • Canadian Centre for German and European Studies, University of Montreal and York University
  • Institute of European Studies, University of California, Berkeley
  • Center for German and European Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
  • Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, University of Toronto
  • Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University
  • Center for German and European Studies, Brandeis University

 

Manuscript Submission

Please review the submission and style guidelines carefully before submitting.

Manuscripts should be submitted electronically to:
Eric Langenbacher
Managing Editor, German Politics and Society
gpsjournal@georgetown.edu

Articles and forum pieces usually run between 20 and 30 double-spaced pages (4,000 to 8,000 words, including notes and references); review articles between 8 and 10 pages (1,500 to 2,000 words); book reviews between 4 and 8 pages (750 to 1,500 words). All articles and forum pieces undergo a double-blind peer review process. We make every effort to inform authors of the referees' verdict within two months of submission.

We prefer articles to be submitted in English. On extremely rare occasions, we will consider translating German-language submissions.

Notes

Our notation format follows The Chicago Manual of Style.
Notes should be kept to a minimum.
We strongly discourage the use of internal notes accompanied by a list of sources.
We use endnotes rather than footnotes and prefer manuscripts to be submitted accordingly.

Have other questions? Please refer to the Berghahn Info for Authors page for general information and guidelines including topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors.


Ethics Statement

Authors published in German Politics and Society (GPS) certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews, and some types of commentary, have been subjected to double-blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While the publishers and the editorial board make every to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions, or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete GPS ethics statement.

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This article examines how German Turks employ the German Jewish trope to establish an analogous discourse for their own position in German society. Drawing on the literature on immigrant incorporation, we argue that immigrants take more established minority groups as a model in their incorporation process. Here, we examine how German Turks formulate and enact their own incorporation into German society. They do that, we argue, by employing the master narrative and socio-cultural repertoire of Germany's principal minority, German Jewry. This is accomplished especially in relation to racism and antisemitism, as an organizational model and as a political model in terms of making claims against the German state. We argue that in order to understand immigrant incorporation, it is not sufficient to look at state-immigrant relations only—authors also need to look at immigrant groups' relationships with other minority groups.

Author: Joachim Schild

France and Germany played a highly visible leadership role during the management of the Euro crisis and the efforts to design a reform governance framework for the Euro area. This article provides a conceptualization of this bilateral leadership, which is then applied to trace the process of Franco-German leadership during the ongoing crisis of the Euro area. Franco-German leadership grew ever more important as the crisis deepened. After the French presidential election of 2012, however, the divergences between the two core states of the Euro area deepened and made the exercise of joint leadership more difficult to achieve. I consider this leadership role to be based on a compromise by proxy logic in which France and Germany, starting from divergent positions, strike bilateral compromises acceptable to other member states that feel their own interests are represented by either France or Germany. Their common capacity to find suitable remedies to cope with crisis, however, is not beyond doubt. The Franco-German approach followed an additive logic, combining the temporary and permanent financial support schemes-a French preference-with a concomitant strengthening of fiscal rules advocated by Germany. In the end, the two governments did not develop a common comprehensive strategy based on a shared conceptual framework.

Only a decade ago, slow growth and high unemployment plagued Germany, but the "sick man of Europe" has now moved to outperform the Eurozone average growth since the second quarter of 2010. This confirms Germany's recovery and its status as the growth engine of the continent. This surely is a success story. While Germany (also Austria and the Netherlands) is prospering, the peripheral countries in the Eurozone are confronted with a severe sovereign debt crisis. Starting in Greece, it soon spread to countries such as Ireland, Portugal, and Spain. In the course of the debate, Germany was blamed for the imbalances in Europe. In short, German export performance and the sustained pressure for moderate wage increases have provided German exporters with the competitive advantage to dominate trade and capital flows within the Eurozone. Thus, Germany is seen as the main beneficiary of the EURO. This argument, however, is vehemently disputed within Germany. Many economists and political leaders reject this argument and point to the flagrant lack of fiscal discipline in many of the peripheral countries. Some prominent economists, such as Hans-Werner Sinn, even disputes that Germany was the main beneficiary of the Eurozone. The paper analyzes the two sides of the controversy, and asks whether we are witnessing a more inwardlooking and Euroskeptic Germany. These issues will be analyzed by first focusing on the role of Germany in resolving the sovereign debt crisis in Greece, and the European Union negotiations for a permanent rescue mechanism. We conclude by discussing some possible explanations for Germany's more assertive and more Euroskeptic position during these negotiations.

Ethnic enclaves in West Berlin and now, East Berlin are located in denigrated areas of high unemployment, poverty, and devalued or high-rise public housing, but they are also places where immigrants are slowly integrating into the larger city and German society. Despite different national origins and different conditions and periods in which they arrived, socially excluded Vietnamese, Russian, and other migrants to East Berlin are following local incorporation paths surprisingly similar to those of the Turks in West Berlin. In both Kreuzberg and Marzahn, the rise of multicultural forms and events, economic niches, and ethnic associations make local life attractive and ultimately, contribute to immigrant incorporation and neighborhood revitalization.

Author: A.D. Moses

In 1999, Germans celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Federal Republic. Unlike the fiftieth anniversary of other events in the recent national past—the Nazi seizure of power in 1933, the anti-Jewish pogrom of November 1938, and the unconditional surrender in 1945—this is not an awkward occasion for the country’s elites. On the contrary, the Federal Republic is indisputably Germany’s most successful state, and its record of stability and prosperity compares favorably with that of two prominent neighbors, France and Italy. This anniversary gives us pause to pose the basic questions about West Germany. How was it possible to construct an enduring democracy for a population that, exceptions notwithstanding, had enthusiastically supported Hitler and waged world war to the bitter end?