Blame Avoidance, Crisis Exploitation, and COVID-19 Governance Response in Israel

in Israel Studies Review
Author: Moshe Maor1
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  • 1 Professor of Political Science and Wolfson Family Chair Professor of Public Administration, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel moshe.maor@mail.huji.ac.il
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Abstract

Surprisingly, although the Israeli government adopted unregulated, unorganized, inefficient, uncoordinated, and uninformed governance arrangements during the first wave of COVID-19, the public health outcome was successful, a paradox that this theoretically informed article seeks to explain. Drawing on insights from blame avoidance literature, it develops and applies an analytical framework that focuses on how allegations of policy underreaction in times of crisis pose a threat to elected executives’ reputations and how these politicians can derive opportunities for crisis exploitation from governance choices, especially at politically sensitive junctures. Based on a historical-institutional analysis combined with elite interviews, it finds that the implementation of one of the most aggressive policy alternatives on the policy menu at the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis (i.e., a shutdown of society and the economy), and the subsequent consistent adoption of the aforementioned governance arrangements constituted a politically well-calibrated and effective short-term strategy for Prime Minister Netanyahu.

Contributor Notes

MOSHE MAOR is Professor of Political Science and Wolfson Family Chair Professor of Public Administration at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His current research interests focus on bureaucratic politics, policy dynamics, and Israeli governance and politics. He has published three books, six edited books, and more than 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals including Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Governance, Public Administration, Policy Sciences, Journal of Public Policy, Public Administration Review, European Journal of Political Research, and Journal of Theoretical Politics. Recently he has developed the Disproportionate Policy Perspective (Policy Sciences, 2017). E-mail: moshe.maor@mail.huji.ac.il

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