Memory as Absence and Presence

Pilgrimage, “Archeo-Theology,“ and the Creativity of Destruction

in Journeys

This article explores forms of history and memory constructed around the Christian pilgrimage site of Walsingham, England. While exploring different ways of appropriating the past exhibited by pilgrims, ranging from “reliving,“ “remixing,“ and “reframing,“ the article argues that Walsingham's powerful symbolic resonances emerge in part from its role as a context for “archeotheology,“ whereby a sacramental religious ideology is reinforced by the forms of ruination evident at key points of the site.

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Journeys

The International Journal of Travel and Travel Writing