Show Summary Details
Restricted access

English Journeys

the tourist, the guidebook, and the motorcar in The Remains of the Day

Sarah Gibson

While debates on tourism have predominantly focused on the role played by literature or the cinema as creating the desire to travel to different sites and sights (Urry 2002), little has been written on what happens when the film adaptation itself is the tourist attraction; when the act of viewing a film is equivalent to a tourist practice. This film, like the other Merchant Ivory productions, is as much a tourist attraction as it is a film narrative. Both of these models of tourism (literary and cinematic) are, however, predicated upon a corporeal mobility of the tourist to a geographical location. This can be supplemented today by a virtual mobility via the cinema screen: a virtual English journey. The Remains of the Day thus brings together these varying discourses of tourism: travel literature; literary tourism; cinematic tourism; and finally the virtual tourism offered by the adaptation being showcased on the cinema screen. The trope of tourism can thus be appropriated to both constructions and deconstructions of myths of Englishness.

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or log in to access all content.