Editorial

From the Editor

in Projections
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  • 1 University of Queensland, Australia

Welcome to the first issue of Projections for 2021. After a brief hiatus from printing due to the COVID-19 pandemic last year, we are once again publishing online and in print. (A reminder to members of the Society for Cognitive Studies of the Moving Image [SCSMI]: an online subscription to Projections is now the default inclusion for memberships; members who would prefer to receive hard copies can do so by paying a small surcharge.) I would like to thank the team at Berghahn, especially Janine Latham, for their ongoing support. Thanks too are due to associate editors Aaron Taylor and Tim Smith, along with Katalin Bálint who covered for Tim while he was on leave. Finally, I would like to extend special thanks to our referees in 2020 who willing donated their time to support us during what was a very difficult year for everyone. The names of all referees for 2020 are listed below as an acknowledgment of their service.

Welcome to the first issue of Projections for 2021. After a brief hiatus from printing due to the COVID-19 pandemic last year, we are once again publishing online and in print. (A reminder to members of the Society for Cognitive Studies of the Moving Image [SCSMI]: an online subscription to Projections is now the default inclusion for memberships; members who would prefer to receive hard copies can do so by paying a small surcharge.) I would like to thank the team at Berghahn, especially Janine Latham, for their ongoing support. Thanks too are due to associate editors Aaron Taylor and Tim Smith, along with Katalin Bálint who covered for Tim while he was on leave. Finally, I would like to extend special thanks to our referees in 2020 who willing donated their time to support us during what was a very difficult year for everyone. The names of all referees for 2020 are listed below as an acknowledgment of their service.

Due to the global pandemic, the 2020 meeting of the SCSMI occurred virtually, but it was still a resounding success, and the fact that a plenary session interview with filmmaker Paul Schrader was recorded meant that we were able to easily transcribe the interview and print it here as a special feature to this issue.

In addition, we have three articles lined up. The first, by John Hutson and his colleagues, reports the results of an experiment designed to test how suspense is maintained in the opening scene of Touch of Evil (1958). This well-known scene features a long take that begins with a bomb being planted in the trunk of a car and ends with it exploding. The question posed by the authors is, roughly speaking, to what extent do the scene's sound cues play a role in reminding viewers of the bomb and thus sustaining suspense?

Next, Thorbjörn Swenberg and Simon Carlgren discuss the findings of their research on the relationship between musical beats and visual attention in audience reception of music videos. Whereas Hutson and his colleagues focus on how the soundtrack affects aspects of comprehension (e.g., working memory, predictive inference, and so forth), Swenberg and Carlgren investigate how the soundtrack affects aspects of visual attention such as viewers’ eye movements across cuts and pupil size (the latter of which is also, interestingly enough, known to be an indicator of cognitive load).

Our final article for this issue, by Keyvan Sarkhosh and Winfried Menninghaus, addresses a topic that is particularly apt on the heels of 2020: the “feel-good film.” One of the things Sarkhosh and Menninghaus's research shows is, in their words, “from an audience's perspective, feel-good films appear much more complex than their reputation among critics would suggest.” Not only does this genre of film afford substantive emotional benefits, it does so in part by tackling difficult topics. Indeed, the evidence seems to suggest that the emotional uplift created by feel-good films is partly dependent upon an integration of negative feelings in the viewing experience.

Unfortunately, I must close on a more sombre note. The past year was a difficult one for many of us for reasons beyond the global pandemic. I am very sorry to inform readers that Stephen Prince, the President of the SCSMI and previous editor of Projections, passed away in late December. He will be remembered as a generous colleague, prolific scholar, inspiring teacher, and dear friend. SCSMI Board members Carl Plantinga and Malcolm Turvey pay tribute to Steve in this issue.

  

Thanks to referees during 2020

Margherita Arcangeli, Institut Jean Nicod

Daniel Barratt, Copenhagen Business School

David Brown, University of Kent

Tom Brown, King's College London

Jose Cañas-Bajo, Aalto University

Elisa Caldarola, Università di Padova

Maarten Coëgnarts, Independent Scholar

Antonie Coutrot, University of Nantes

Katherine Dale, Florida State University

Adriano D'Aloia, Università della Campania Luigi Vanvitelli

Mario De Caro, Università Roma Tre and Tufts University

Markus Huff, Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien

Nikica Gilić, University of Zagreb

Torben Grodal, University of Copenhagen

Jason Jacobs, University of Queensland

Timothy Justus, Pomona College

Guan-Soon Khoo, Roanoke College

Anna Kolesnikov, University of Parma

András Balínt Kovács, Eötvös Loránd University

Daniel Levin, Vanderbilt University

Krunoslav Lučić, University of Zagreb

Joseph Magliano, Georgia State University

Richard Neupert, University of Georgia

Goran Pavlić, University of Zagreb

Karen Pearlman, Macquarie University

Carl Plantinga, Calvin University

Johannes Riis, University of Copenhagen

Brendan Rooney, University College Dublin

Daniela Tagliafico, Università di Torino

Ed Tan, University of Amsterdam

Aaron Taylor, University of Lethbridge

Eleftheria Thanouli, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Hrvoje Turković, University of Zagreb

Malcolm Turvey, Tufts University

Margrethe Bruun Vaage, University of Kent

Adriana Clavel-Vazquez, University of Oxford

Alberto Voltolini, Università di Torino

Projections

The Journal for Movies and Mind

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