Around Abby Day’s Believing in Belonging

Belief and Social Identity in the Modern World

in Religion and Society
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Contributor Notes

CHRISTOPHER R. COTTER is completing doctoral research at Lancaster University. He is Co-editor-in-Chief of the Religious Studies Project, Co-director of the Nonreligion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN), and Honorary Treasurer of the British Association for the Study of Religions (BASR); c.cotter@lancaster.ac.uk.

GRACE DAVIE is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Exeter. She has published widely on religion in Britain, Europe, and North America, and on the sub-discipline of the sociology of religion; g.r.c.davie@exeter.ac.uk.

JAMES A. BECKFORD is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Warwick and a Fellow of the British Academy. He has published widely on minority religious movements, religions in prison, and social theories of religion; j.a.beckford@warwick.ac.uk.

SALIHA CHATTOO is a doctoral student in the University of Toronto’s Department for the Study of Religion. Her research focuses on publicity, performance, and conversion within the context of evangelical youth groups in the United States; saliha.chattoo@mail.utoronto.ca.

MIA LÖVHEIM is Professor of Sociology of Religion and a steering group member of the research program titled “The Impact of Religion: Challenges for Society, Law, and Religion.” Her research and publications focus on analyzing representations of religion and gender in the Nordic daily press and in blogs; mia.lovheim@teol.uu.se.

MANUEL A. VÁSQUEZ is the author of More Than Belief: A Materialist Theory of Religion (2011). He has published extensively in the fields of religion and globalization, transnational migration and religious networks, religion in Latin America and among US Latinos/as, and method and theory; fuso.vasquez@gmail.com.

ABBY DAY has researched belief and belonging across three generations for more than 10 years. She is a Reader in Race, Faith and Culture at Goldsmiths, University of London; abby.day@gold.ac.uk.

Religion and Society

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