Sibirica

Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberian Studies

Editor: Jenanne Ferguson, MacEwan University, Canada 


Subjects: Anthropology, Siberian Studies


Sibirica is a part of the Berghahn Open Anthro subscribe-to-open initiative, a pilot aiming to convert 13 Anthropology journals to full Open Access on an on-going and sustainable basis.

Latest Issue Table of Contents

Volume 19 (2020): Issue 3 (Dec 2020)

Volume 20 / 2021, 3 issues per volume (spring, summer, winter)

Aims & Scope

Sibirica is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal covering all aspects of the region and relations to neighboring areas, such as Central Asia, East Asia, and North America.

The journal publishes articles, research reports, conference and book reviews on history, politics, economics, geography, cultural studies, anthropology, and environmental studies. It provides a forum for scholars representing a wide variety of disciplines from around the world to present findings and discuss topics of relevance to human activities in the region or directly relevant to Siberian studies.

The editors aim to foster a scholarly discussion among people with the most varied backgrounds and points of view. Submissions are welcomed from scholars ranging from the humanities to the natural sciences. Articles that discuss other geographical areas but make direct comparisons with Siberian peoples will be considered.


Indexed/Abstracted

Sibirica is indexed/abstracted in:

  • Abstracts in Anthropology (Baywood Publishing)
  • American Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies
  • Anthropological Index (RAI)
  • Anthropological Literature (Tozzer Library – Harvard University)
  • Arctic & Antarctic Regions (Ebsco)
  • Bibliography of Asian Studies (Association for Asian Studies)
  • Bibliometric Research Indicator List (BFI)
  • Biography Index (H.W. Wilson)
  • A Current Bibliography on African Affairs (Baywood)
  • Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science)
  • Historical Abstracts (Ebsco)
  • IBR – International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature on the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBZ – International Bibliography of Periodical Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences (De Gruyter)
  • IBSS – International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (Proquest)
  • International Political Science Abstracts Database (OVID)
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • Periodicals Index Online (Proquest)
  • Scopus (Elsevier)
  • SocINDEX (Ebsco)
  • Social Sciences Index (Ebsco)
  • Social Sciences Abstracts (Ebsco)
  • Social Services Abstracts (Proquest)

Editor
Jenanne Ferguson, MacEwan University, Canada

Associate Editors
Dmitrii Arzyutov, KTH Royal University of Technology, Sweden

Marisa Karyl Franz, New York University, USA
Joachim Otto Habeck, Universität Hamburg, Germany 
Ryan T. Jones, University of Oregon, USA
John P. Ziker, Boise State University, USA

Editorial Advisory Board
Elena B. Alekseeva, Institute of History and Archaeology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Russia
David G. Anderson, University of Aberdeen, UK

Tatiana Argounova-Low, University of Aberdeen, UK
Marjorie Mandelstam Balzer, Georgetown University, USA
Mark Bassin, Södertörn University, Sweden
Alfrid K. Bustanov, European University of St. Petersburg, Russia
Jessica Graybill, Colgate University, USA
Peter Jordan, University of Groningen, Netherlands
Alexander D. King, Franklin & Marshall College, USA
Kostantin Klokov, St. Petersburg State University, Russian Federation
Igor Krupnik, Smithsonian Institute, USA
Erika Monahan, University of New Mexico, USA
Patricia Polansky, University of Hawaii, USA

Matthew Romaniello, Weber State University, USA
Hiroki Takakura, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Alan Wood, University of Lancaster, UK 
Andrei Znamenski, University of Memphis, USA

Manuscript Submission

Please review the submission and style guidelines carefully before submitting.

Submissions should be prepared as Microsoft Word or Rich Text Format (rtf) files and submitted using the online submissions system: ojs.berghahnjournals.com/index.php/sib

Authors must register with the journal on the submission website prior to submitting, or, if already registered, they can simply log in. On registering as an Author, authors have the option of also registering as a Reviewer (to be called upon to undertake peer reviews of other submissions).

Authors interested in reviewing books, films, museum exhibits, conferences or writing review articles should contact the Reviews Editor (John Ziker) at sibiricareviews@gmail.com). All other editorial inquiries should go to the editor (Jenanne Feguson) at sibiricajournal@gmail.com.

Articles should normally be 6,000 to 10,000 words (including notes and references), although longer articles may be considered. Research reports should be 2,000 to 6,000 words, reviews should be 800 words, and discussions should be 1,000 to 5,000 words.

Please refer to the Berghahn Info for Authors page for general information and guidelines regarding topics such as article usage and permissions for Berghahn journal article authors.


License Agreement

As part of the Berghahn Open Anthro initiative, articles in Sibirica are published open access under a Creative Commons license.

Authors must visit our License Options page to select and download their preferred license agreement. Completed and signed forms should be sent to copyright@berghahnjournals.com.


Statement of Professional Integrity

Sibirica expects the highest professional integrity, including ethical responsibility in the conduct of the research itself. Authors published in Sibirica certify that their works are original and their own. The editors certify that all materials, with the possible exception of editorial introductions, book reviews, and some types of commentary, have been subjected to double-blind peer review by qualified scholars in the field. While every effort is made by the publishers and the editorial board to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions or statements appear in this journal, they wish to make it clear that the data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the sole responsibility of the contributor concerned. For a more detailed explanation concerning these qualifications and responsibilities, please see the complete Sibirica statement of professional integrity.

Annual Subscriptions

Volume 20/2021, 3 issues p.a. (spring, summer, winter)
ISSN 1361-7362 (Print) · ISSN 1476-6787 (Online)
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Free Sample Issue (Online)
Recommend to your Library

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Studies in the Circumpolar North

berghahnbooks.com/series/studies-in-the-circumpolar-north

Editors:

Olga Ulturgasheva, University of Manchester
Alexander D. King, Franklin & Marshall College, PA

The Circumpolar North encapsulates all the major issues confronting the world today: enduring colonial legacies for indigenous people and the landscape, climate change and resource extraction industries, international diplomatic tensions, and lived realities of small communities in the interconnected modern world system. This book series provides a showcase for cutting-edge academic research on the lives of Arctic and Sub-arctic communities past and present. Understanding the contemporary Circumpolar North requires a multiplicity of perspectives and we welcome works from the social sciences, humanities and the arts.

Dialogue for Development

An Exploration of Relations between Oil and Gas Companies, Communities, and the State

This introduction provides an overview of academic research and current practice relating to stakeholder dialogue around oil and gas development in the Russian North, Siberia and the Russian Far East. We discuss the two main strands of analysis in this special issue: (a) regulation and impact assessment; and (b) relationship-building in practice, with a particular focus on indigenous communities. We argue that an effective regulatory framework, meaningful dialogue, and imaginative organization of stakeholder relations are required to minimize negative impacts and maximize benefits from oil and gas projects. Self-interest, mistrust, and a lack of collective agency frequently lead to ineffective planning and heightened tensions in relations. We identify lessons to be learned from partnerships and initiatives already established in Sakhalin and Western Siberia, despite the lack of a stable legal framework to govern relations. This issue focuses on the academic-practitioner interface, emphasizing the importance of practical application of academic research and the value of non-academic contributions to academic debates.

Bridging the Boreal Forest

Siberian Archaeology and the Emergence of Pottery among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherers of Northern Eurasia

This article examines Siberia's increasingly important role in the study of the emergence of pottery across northern Eurasia. The world's earliest pottery comes from Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer sites in East Asia. This material is typically seen as disconnected from later pottery traditions in Europe, which are generally associated with sedentary farmers. However, new evidence suggests that Asian and European pottery traditions may be linked to a Hyperborean stream of hunter-gatherer pottery dispersals that spanned eastern and western Asia, and introduced pottery into the prehistoric societies of northern Europe. As a potential bridge between the eastern and western early pottery traditions, Siberia's prehistory is therefore set to play an increasingly central role in one of world archaeology's most important debates.

Tyvan conceptions of spirit masters, their attributed domains of knowledge, and their places of devotion show signs of an adaptive function. Drawing from current research in the cognitive and evolutionary ecological studies of religion, I analyze interview data collected in the Tyva Republic during the summer of 2009 and construct an interpretation for why the ritual stone cairn (ovaa) tradition evolved and persists in Central Asia. As spirit masters in Tyva are acutely concerned with sustained costs and most ovaa that people pass are on territories of non-kin, I argue that because of the ecology of the region, the ovaa practice evolved to provide places to signal solidarity to others. Given the logic of spirit masters' concerns and ritual practice at cairns and the ecological context in which they operate, these components of traditional Tyvan religion are adaptive insofar as they foster cooperation and social bonds.

Population Change in the Periphery

Changing Migration Patterns in the Russian North

This article examines changes in the migration system in the Russian North over the two decades since the breakup of the Soviet Union and the beginning of economic reforms using unpublished data from the Federal State Statistics Service of Russia. This is done by computing several measures of migration for selected northern regions: 1) measures of migration efficiency to determine the extent to which migration in the northern regions is redistributing the population; 2) migration transition probabilities to measure changes in the origins and destinations of migrants in the Russian North; and 3) the average distance of moves to determine the effects that increased costs of transportation have on migration. The regions examined in this article include Khanty-Mansi and Iamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrugs, Chukotka Autonomous Okrug and Magadan Oblast', and Murmansk Oblast'. The findings show that as the market has taken hold, regions of economic growth are becoming primary migration destinations for persons migrating both to and from the North.

The legal position of indigenous minorities in the Russian Federation is defined, first and foremost, by constitutional principles, which guarantee equal rights and freedoms to individuals and citizens. In reality, however, equality between indigenous minorities and other ethnic groups of the Russian Federation, in terms of the possibility of exercising their rights, depends largely on the conditions in which they live and conduct their livelihood activities. The rights of indigenous minorities are primarily concerned with preserving their ethnic identity, languages, culture, way of life, and livelihood activities. Additional safeguards are required to resolve contemporary issues related to the above.