Decolonising Borders

Re-imagining Strangeness and Spaces

in Theoria
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  • 1 University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa john.sanni@wits.ac.za
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Abstract

This paper seeks to address the problem of strangeness within the context of migration in Africa. I draw on historical realities that inform existing international and African discourses on migration. I hope to show that most African countries have unconsciously bought into international arguments that drive the legitimacy of building walls, visible and invisible, and the promotion of stringent migration policies that minimise the influx of African immigrants. I draw on political and philosophical positions of African thinkers like Kwame Nkrumah, among others, in my theorisation of strangeness and the need to dispel the potential negative conception of strangeness within Africa's migration policies. I juxtapose these positions with Western political theories with the hope of emphasizing African humanism as a key conception worth considering when decolonising borders.

Contributor Notes

John Sodiq Sanni currently works as a postdoctoral research fellow in the NRF/British Academy Chair in Political Theory (Political Studies Department) at the University of the Witwatersrand. He also works as a sessional lecturer of social and political philosophy in the philosophy department at the University of Witwatersrand. His research interests include social and political philosophy, continental philosophy (phenomenology), political theory, African philosophy and migration studies. E-mail: sodjohnsan@gmail.com; John.Sanni@wits.ac.za

Theoria

A Journal of Social and Political Theory

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